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Importance
3
If your child resists college search
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Nov 21, 2021
“A frustrated parent brought an unnerving problem to my Admissions 101 discussion group on washingtonpost.com. The student (many of us in the group immediately assumed it was a boy) had gotten into a well-respected public university in his state and, the parent said, "adamantly refused to go on co...”
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After Dropping Free Community College Plan, Democrats Explore Options
by NYT > Education
Oct 23, 2021
“Expanded tuition assistance remains an option for the budget bill, but how much it would help students — and economic competitiveness — remains to be seen.”
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Some colleges put new vaccine mandates in place — for the flu
by Local Education
Oct 22, 2021
“As universities continue to weather the pandemic, they're also preparing for a flu season that some health experts predict will be more severe than normal.”
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‘Promises Made Just Have to Be Promises Kept’: Black Colleges Feel Stung by Democrats
by NYT > Education
Oct 21, 2021
“A rift is forming over a plan to provide only $2 billion out of the $20 billion President Biden proposed to help level the playing field in his social spending package.”
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Amherst College Ends Legacy Admissions Favoring Children of Alumni
by NYT > Education
Oct 20, 2021
“The highly selective college in Massachusetts will be among the first elite schools in the country to abandon the practice, which has been a persistent barrier to increasing student diversity.”
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University of North Carolina Can Keep Affirmative Action, Judge Rules
by NYT > Education
Oct 19, 2021
“Students for Fair Admissions vowed to immediately appeal in a case that appears destined for the Supreme Court.”
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Meet the 63-year-old college athlete with a killer golf swing
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 17, 2021
“Debbie Blount is, for the most part, your average college undergrad, trying to make it through the semester amid piles of homework and a packed after-school schedule.”
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A Blackface ‘Othello’ Shocks, and a Professor Steps Back From Class
by NYT > Education
Oct 16, 2021
“Students objected after the composer Bright Sheng showed the 1965 film of Laurence Olivier’s “Othello” to his class at the University of Michigan.”
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U.S.C. to Issue Honorary Degrees to Displaced Japanese Students
by NYT > Education
Oct 16, 2021
“Jonathan Kaji, former president of the Asian Pacific Alumni Association at the University of Southern California, has been pushing the school to apologize for its treatment of its Nisei students since 2007.”
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63-year-old woman joins college golfing team
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 15, 2021
“After the death of her husband and father, 63-year-old, Debbie Blount, becomes the first person in her family to go to college as she joins the women's golf team at Reinhardt University.”
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Civil rights leader Timuel Black dies at 102
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 15, 2021
“Civil rights leader Timuel Black died Wednesday at the age of 102, according to a statement from the University of Chicago where he obtained a master's degree in 1954.”
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Georgia’s University System Takes On Tenure
by NYT > Education
Oct 15, 2021
“The Board of Regents has given its universities the power to fire tenured professors without faculty input. Now some fear that academic freedom is threatened, too.”
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Confronting Sinema in a bathroom was outrageous
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 13, 2021
“Last week, activists posted a video of themselves following Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona into a public bathroom at the university where she teaches -- right to the door of her stall -- to protest her stance on immigration. As a woman who vehemently disagrees with Sinema's opposition to President Joe Biden's proposals, I'm outraged and incredibly concerned by this abusive and counterproductive tactic -- and by the failure of her male colleagues to call it out.”
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Confronting Kyrsten Sinema in a bathroom was outrageous
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 11, 2021
“Last week, activists posted a video of themselves following Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona into a public bathroom at the university where she teaches -- right to the door of her stall -- to protest her stance on immigration. As a woman who vehemently disagrees with Sinema's opposition to President Joe Biden's proposals, I'm outraged and incredibly concerned by this abusive and counterproductive tactic -- and by the failure of her male colleagues to call it out.”
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No college degree? More employers than ever just don't care
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 11, 2021
“If you don't have a four-year college degree, you're hardly alone. The majority of US working age adults do not.”
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Varsity Blues Scandal: Outcomes in the College Admissions Case
by NYT > Education
Oct 09, 2021
“Dozens of parents and others have pleaded guilty. Here’s what happened to a few of them.”
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Brazil passes grim milestone of 600,000 Covid-19 deaths, second only to US
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 10, 2021
“Brazil on Friday surpassed the grim milestone of 600,000 Covid-19 deaths, the second-highest number of fatalities in the world after the United States, according to John Hopkins University data.”
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'Ted Lasso' is not about what you think
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 08, 2021
“The breakout show of the pandemic has been Apple+'s "Ted Lasso," now just finished with its second season. The titular character, an American college football coach who improbably finds himself coaching the fictional English football club AFC Richmond, seems to exude kindness and optimism. He comes across as a folksy rube at the beginning -- the worst kind of stereotype of Americans abroad -- but during the first season manages to win just about everyone over to his side even in the face of betrayal and disaster. The second season seemed to continue this trajectory, as Ted and those around him confront their inner demons.”
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The Varsity Blues Trial: What We've Learned About College Admissions
by NYT > Education
Oct 08, 2021
“In closing arguments at the Varsity Blues trial, prosecutors focused on bribes, but the ways in which universities cater to rich families are also on trial.”
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Importance
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With youth vaccine rates still low, D.C. awards first college scholarship as part of incentive program
by Local Education
Oct 06, 2021
“Freshman Travanna Lewis is the first of eight raffle winners of a $25,000 college scholarship.”
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Importance
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Facebook movie 'The Social Network' shows the folly of Ivy envy
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Oct 07, 2021
“This time of year, with high school seniors slogging through one college application after another and parents jittery about their children's futures, I often write columns explaining why it doesn't matter where they go to school.”
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The Fisk Jubilee Singers Celebrate 150 Years of Songs and Spirituals
by NYT > Education
Oct 05, 2021
“For 150 years, the Fisk Jubilee Singers have performed spirituals that saved a university and helped raise generations up from the bonds of slavery.”
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Opinion: McConnell's Supreme Court
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 05, 2021
“Amy Coney Barrett, who was confirmed to the Supreme Court a year ago, gave a speech a few weeks ago in which she said the justices were not "partisan hacks." Justice Barrett did this at the University of Louisville, at the 30th anniversary celebration of a center named in honor of Mitch McConnell, Republican minority leader in the US Senate.”
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From Google ads to NFL sponsorships: Colleges throw billions at marketing themselves to attract students
by Local Education
Oct 04, 2021
“Catholic University President John Garvey said colleges “are competing for students, and marketing is how you have to do that.””
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What McConnell's Supreme Court is trying to do
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Oct 04, 2021
“Amy Coney Barrett, who was confirmed to the Supreme Court a year ago, gave a speech a few weeks ago in which she said the justices were not "partisan hacks." Justice Barrett did this at the University of Louisville, at the 30th anniversary celebration of a center named in honor of Mitch McConnell, Republican minority leader in the US Senate.”
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Educators hope STEM bug bites more students
by washingtonpost.com - Jay Mathews: Class Struggle
Oct 03, 2021
“I know how high school course choices affect college chances, but I know much less about how they affect lives. For that kind of advice, I rely on some experienced career specialists, such as Ann Emerson of Stafford County public schools. She sent me a refreshingly cool appraisal of the red hot...”
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11 Arrested in Fraternity Pledge’s Alcohol-Poisoning Death, Police Say
by NYT > Education
Sep 30, 2021
“Adam Oakes, a 19-year-old student at Virginia Commonwealth University, died in February after being told to drink a bottle of Jack Daniel’s whiskey, family members say.”
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Clarissa Ward is back in Kabul. Here's what she's seeing
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 29, 2021
“Women will no longer be allowed to attend classes or work at Kabul University "until an Islamic environment is created," the school's new Taliban-appointed chancellor announced, in the latest move excluding Afghanistan's women from public life. CNN's Clarissa Ward reports.”
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8 arrested on charges connected to death of 19-year-old VCU student
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 28, 2021
“Police have arrested eight people on misdemeanor charges in connection with the death of a Virginia Commonwealth University student earlier this year.”
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Importance
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Japan's Princess Mako to give up one-off payment in controversial marriage
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 28, 2021
“Japan's Princess Mako is set to forego a one-off million-dollar payment for giving up her royal status to wed a college classmate, local media said on Saturday, clearing the way for a marriage delayed for years by controversy over her fiance.”
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In the Elizabeth Holmes criminal case, the media is also on trial
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 27, 2021
“For a time, Elizabeth Holmes was a media darling. The college dropout who started her blood-testing company Theranos at 19 graced the cover of magazines such as Forbes, Fortune, and Inc. in her signature black turtleneck to help cultivate her image as "the next Steve Jobs." She was upheld as a rare female founder who'd raised significant sums of capital to drive her startup towards an eye-popping $9 billion valuation.”
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8 Arrested in Fraternity Pledge’s Alcohol-Poisoning Death, Police Say
by NYT > Education
Sep 26, 2021
“Adam Oakes, a 19-year-old student at Virginia Commonwealth University, died in February after being told to drink a bottle of Jack Daniel’s whiskey, family members say.”
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Man accused of killing Kristin Smart 25 years ago will stand trial for her death
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 22, 2021
“The man accused of killing 19-year-old college student Kristin Smart in 1996 will stand trial for her death, according to the San Luis Obispo County District Attorney's office.”
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According to the new Bob Woodward and Robert Costa book, a Trump lawyer wrote out a plan for then Vice President Mike Pence to overturn the 2020 election
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 21, 2021
“A conservative lawyer working with then-President Donald Trump's legal team tried to convince then-Vice President Mike Pence that he could overturn the election results on January 6 when Congress counted the Electoral College votes by throwing out electors from seven states, according to the new book "Peril" from Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa.”
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3 people were shot at a Pennsylvania baby shower after an argument over gifts, police say
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 20, 2021
“• 2 people were killed in a shooting at North Carolina Central University, police say”
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College professor recognizes 17th century masterpiece hanging in a nearby church
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 20, 2021
“A simple act led to an art history professor discovering a 17th century masterpiece that was thought to have been missing.”
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Challenges in first weeks of school in D.C.: Testing, quarantining and contact tracing
by Local Education
Sep 19, 2021
“Some D.C. parents remain frustrated by how campuses are handling quarantines and data shows the District has failed so far to reach its goals for testing students for the coronavirus.”
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More than 100 part-timers at college left jobless after refusing Covid-19 vaccine
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 18, 2021
“At least 125 part-time employees at Indiana University Health system, the largest physicians network in the state, have lost their jobs for not complying with Covid-19 vaccination requirements, a spokeswoman said Friday.”
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Champion gymnasts shine righteous light on FBI
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 17, 2021
“Olympic gymnasts Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney and Aly Raisman and former college champion Maggie Nichols on Wednesday offered devastating testimony, sometimes through their tears, to the Senate Judiciary Committee about how USA Gymnastics, their sport's governing body, and the FBI, America's principal federal law enforcement agency, mishandled investigations into convicted sexual abuser Larry Nassar. The former USA Gymnastics team doctor was accused of violating more than 200 victims and is now serving a prison sentence of 40 to 175 years.”
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As College Admissions Trial Begins, Parents Claim They Were Duped
by NYT > Education
Sep 13, 2021
“The first parents to face trial in the Operation Varsity Blues scandal are casting blame both on Rick Singer, the admissions consultant, and the overall process.”
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Two Parents Are the First to Face Trial in College Admissions Scandal
by NYT > Education
Sep 13, 2021
“At issue are the parents’ conduct, U.S.C.’s admissions practices and possibly the fairness of the college admissions process itself.”
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Why the SAT May be the Best Option
by NYT > Education
Sep 13, 2021
“As long as schools brag about their low admission rates, campus diversity initiatives will always be about tweaking around the edges.”
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Cure for loss of SAT/ACT tests: Stop banning high school kids from college courses
by Local Education
Sep 13, 2021
“We’ll improve college readiness if we let everyone take AP or IB.”
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Harvard Says It Will Not Invest in Fossil Fuels
by NYT > Education
Sep 11, 2021
“The announcement is a major victory for the climate change movement, and marks a striking change in tone for the university.”
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Howard University Hit by a Ransomware Attack
by NYT > Education
Sep 08, 2021
“The Washington school canceled online and hybrid classes for a second day after shutting down its network.”
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How Educational Differences Are Widening America’s Political Rift
by NYT > Education
Sep 08, 2021
“College graduates are now a firmly Democratic bloc, and they are shaping the party’s future. Those without degrees, by contrast, have flocked to Republicans.”
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Professors Fight Mask Bans
by NYT > Education
Sep 08, 2021
“College faculty are nervous about the fall semester.”
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How female athletes are pushing for a level playing field
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 07, 2021
“A viral video of the makeshift weight rooms at this year's NCAA March Madness tournament, posted by University of Oregon's Sedona Prince, gained national attention for encapsulating the gender disparity that exists between men's and women's sports.”
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After 11 days on a ventilator with Covid, Florida teen wants vaccine
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Sep 06, 2021
“• Doctors in Covid-19 hotspots last year are dealing with new record hospitalizations
• Opinion: I'm a college professor, not a Covid guinea pig”

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Importance
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Getting educated while on active duty is getting harder as military rolls back benefits
by Local Education
Sep 05, 2021
“College classes are spottily available to service members, and the Pentagon keeps trying to slash the perk.”
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How to fight big universities that stomp on your local college credits
by Local Education
Sep 06, 2021
“A community college expert exposes lies and weakness in the transfer process.”
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Panelists talk teaching racial justice in public administration
by The GW Hatchet
Oct 01, 2021
“The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration hosted an online webinar about teaching and discussing racial justice in public administration Thursday.
Professors from the University of Cincinnati and Hunter College said public administration officials could find inclusive ways to research and instruct on equity when addressing racial justice through more comprehensive teaching curriculum and reform to research standards. Andrea Headley, an assistant professor at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, and James Wright II, an assistant professor at the Askew School of Public Administration at Florida State University, moderated the event .
Tia Gaynor, an associate professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati, said professors should incorporate racial equity and justice in all conversations because of their impacts on the lives and jobs of scholars in fields like public administration. She said Ohio’s state legislature is currently drafting a bill to prevent the teaching of “divisive concepts” like critical race theory, racism and slavery – legislation that would jeopardize her job as a social justice educator and “gut” liberal arts education in Ohio, if passed.
“It’s critically important not only to explore these conversations but also situate racial justice and racial equity in all conversations,” she said.
Gaynor said faculty can teach about racial justice in the classroom through courses that allow students to dig deeper into issues of inequity while inspecting a diverse selection of materials and resources focused on of racial equity. She said incorporating conversations of racial equity into curriculum allows students to develop a better understanding of historical context and current events and how diverse spaces can broaden collective knowledge.
“We have a responsibility to help our students make the connections between what we’re teaching, what we want them to learn and what we’re seeing happening today in society,” Gaynor said.
Brandi Blessett, an associate professor of public administration at the University of Cincinnati, said exposing students to issues involving race and equity is essential because K-12 education has whitewashed the understanding of the history and the trajectory of the United States. She said teaching different ideas from multiple perspectives enables students to look at information differently.
“There are so many other people in so many other communities that have contributed to our society, to the makeup of our institutions and how we understand where we are today,” she said.
Blessett said because government bureaucracies are hierarchical, researchers need to start listening to community members whom they research from the bottom up instead of the top down in society. She said the people most directly tied to the issues would be best equipped to create strategies of success while working with individuals directly to understand daily challenges and build personal relationships.
“I think that it becomes really important for us to be mindful about how we, as researchers, arrive in these spaces claiming to do racial justice work or racial equity work,” she said.
Karina Moreno, a professor of urban policy and planning at Hunter College, said she observed how people struggled to respond as neutral to racial justice and equity issues when she worked with minority populations during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. She said public administration is not an objective environment because communicating directly and intentionally with an individual does not allow for a neutral position.
“We live in an insidious world where we talk about race without ever saying race,” she said. “It’s like a code, and so I think there’s something very important about being deliberate and being purposeful.””

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Importance
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Men’s and women’s cross country notch record-setting season starts
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 28, 2021
“Both the men’s and women’s squads won their first two meets of the year, becoming the first teams in program history to win both of their first two team events in a season.
The women’s team swept the top six spots at Mount St. Mary’s 5K Duals Sept. 3 to claim its first team win since 2015. Graduate student Margaret Coogan came in first with a time of 18:33.78 followed by a second place finish from graduate student Peri Pavicic.
Freshman Olivia Syftestad, claimed third in her first collegiate race to help the Colonials register the first perfect team score in program history.
Syftestad has made an instant impact on the team as a first-year, scoring in both of the meets thus far. She was named the Atlantic 10 Rookie Performer of the Week on Sept. 8, after placing third at the Mount St. Mary’s Duals in her GW debut. She is the first individual honoree for women’s cross country since Suzanne Dannheim was named the performer of the week in 2019.
Syftestad followed up her performance with a ninth place finish at the James Madison University Invitational Sept. 17, earning another rookie performer of the week nod for a second straight time. The Chicago native said she did not expect to make an immediate impact on the squad, considering the presence of six graduate students already on the roster.
“It’s weird being 18 and running with girls who are like 23 and people who just know what they want to do with their lives,” Syftestad said. “It feels like we’re on completely different paths but I just love how we’re able to come to practice each day. Everyone has that shared desire to just get better and work hard.”
Syftestad and freshman Megan Gonzalez are the only first years in the men’s or women’s programs to feature in both of the meets so far this year.
Head coach Terry Weir said the team held only one workout before the meet. He said he went into the event hoping to evaluate the fitness level of the team and get them back in the swing of competitive running.
Instead, the program walked away with two wins and a perfect score. Weir said the depth of the women’s team this year is “probably the best we’ve ever had.”
The men’s team also finished first in the event with a score of 25, winning its first meet since 2018. Senior Thomas Sand, a transfer from South Alabama, placed second in his GW debut with a time of 15:53.30.
Junior James Glockenmeier and sophomore Kevin Conlon both finished within six seconds of Sand to boost the Colonials’ score and secure the victory.
The men’s and women’s units followed up their opening meet successes by marking another achievement in the record books at the JMU Invitational on Sept. 17. The men came close to earning their own perfect score by nearly locking in the top five spots, finishing in first, third, fourth, fifth and tenth places en route to a team score of 23.
Glockenmeier won his first career individual race, winning the 8K with a time of 25:43.50 to lead the way for GW. Four days later, Glockenmeier was named the A-10’s men’s performer of the week. Sand’s time of 26:01.50 was fast enough to finish in third place.
Pavicic’s time of 19:02.30 was the best among the women’s team in the 5K and third best across all runners. Four other Colonials finished inside the top 10, giving them a team score of 31 and a second consecutive win.
“It’s really exciting because we definitely have the opportunity to do really well this year,” Syftestad said. “I think the team’s been growing and expanding for so long and I think we’re in a really good position at this point, that if we all are on the same page, and we’re all healthy, hopefully we can definitely make an impact.”
Syftestad said her main goal for the season is to stay healthy and “trust” her body because she still has three more years to come.
Weir said he is trying not to place pressure upon her as a first year runner, but that her performance thus far is “a great place to start.”
“The sky’s the limit for Olivia,” Weir said. “We’re really excited to see what the rest of the year holds for her. But more so just going through this journey with her for the next four years, developing as a speedy student athlete that she is.”
Upon his arrival at GW in 2011, Weir has overseen a steady buildup of the program since the men’s and women’s teams finished 13th out of 14 teams in the A-10 Championship in the same year. The women’s cross country nabbed a second place finish at the A-10 Championship in 2020 – its highest in program history.
“We definitely want to win an A-10 team championship for both our men and women in cross country,” Weir said. “That’s a big goal for us now and I think it’s a realistic goal for us. I know we’re going to do that here in the next year or two, it’s going to happen for sure.”
Weir said he wants a team to qualify for the NCAA Championship after Dannheim became the second runner to qualify for the tournament in program history with a seventh place finish at the NCAA Mid-Atlantic Regional in 2019.
The Colonials will compete in the Paul Short Run Colonials, hosted by Lehigh, on Oct. 1. GW’s last time out was in 2019, where the men’s and women’s squads finished 13th and 15th, respectively.”

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Communication needed to convey FAFSA changes: experts
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 28, 2021
“After Congress expanded eligibility for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid last June, higher education experts said officials should launch an informational outreach campaign to prevent confusion over the changes.
Federal officials and higher education institutions will no longer consider questions on the FAFSA asking whether applicants have registered with the Selective Service – a federal database of those eligible to be drafted into military service – or if they have been convicted on drug-related charges. Half a dozen experts in higher education policy said the updates to FAFSA will increase access to higher education but may lead to more confusion for new students registering for aid since the required eligibility questions will still appear on the form.
The 2021 FAFSA Simplification Act – signed into law by then-President Donald Trump in December 2020 as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021 – mandated that the U.S. Department of Education decrease the number of questions on the FAFSA from 108 to 36 and expanded student eligibility for federal Pell Grants.
“Twenty million students and their families are in the middle of what is likely the strangest first semester of college in a century,” then-Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., a sponsor of the legislation, said in a statement last September. “Almost everything has changed for students, except for one thing – students still have to answer 108 questions on the dreaded FAFSA form.”
The form, which will open Friday, will still include the two eligibility questions because the legislation came “too late” for the FAFSA to be changed, according to an ED release . ED officials issued a letter to higher education leaders in June advising student aid offices to disregard applicants’ answers about drug-related convictions and Selective Service registration while the questions remain on the form.
University spokesperson Crystal Nosal did not return a request for a comment on the changes to the form this year.
Jackie Dioses, a sophomore majoring in political science, said she wishes GW communicated the FAFSA changes to the student body so she could better prepare to complete the form. She said she has to gather a lot of family financial information to complete the form, making accurately completing it particularly “confusing.”
“This is probably something that should be made a little more clear,” Dioses said. “They should just send a quick email to keep us informed.”
She said the University should offer more advising and logistical assistance to students filling out financial documents like the FAFSA given the complexity of the questions and the amount of personal financial information students need to provide.
The Office of Student Financial Assistance’s website posts GW’s financial aid policies , a glossary of financial terminology and a guide to financial literacy . But the office’s Financial Education Resource List, which outlines resources for students to gather and submit financial information, was not functional and displayed an internal error message as of Sunday.
“We should definitely have some financial counseling, at least for those who don’t know the most or need extra help,” Dioses said.
Annabelle Manzo, a sophomore majoring in women’s, gender and sexuality studies, said filling out the FAFSA is a “stressful experience” because officials do not offer enough support and financial literacy resources for students to complete the form.
“I am a first-generation college student, so that comes with a lot of anxiety around these sorts of things,” Manzo said. “There’s this fear of doing it wrong and then not being able to get aid, which is very important because we don’t have the finances for me to go to college without it.”
Experts in higher education said the changes made to the FAFSA helped separate a family’s financial and academic status from their student aid packages. But they said federal and university financial aid offices need to clarify, through announcements and individual communication, that students not registered with the Selective Service or who have had past drug-related convictions are still eligible for financial aid.
ED officials and experts said students with drug-related convictions and those not registered with the Selective Service may have been ineligible for financial aid in previous years.
Jill Desjean, a policy analyst at the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, said even though the questions shouldn’t affect application status, officials will still “flag” FAFSA applicants and flash an error message on their portal, stating they may be ineligible for aid with a drug conviction or without Selective Service registration.
“It’s reasonable to expect that some students could be confused,” Desjean said. “When they’re told one thing in one place and another thing in the other place, it’s hard to know which source of information you can trust.”
She said ED officials are planning an outreach program to email students who receive error messages regarding either of the two questions and requesting that students contact their financial aid office for guidance on the changes and how to move forward. Desjean said University officials should also individually reach out to students to clarify the process.
“They should be targeting the students whose student aid reports come with these flags on them,” she said. “They’re probably also including some kind of message that says, ‘You might have seen on your student aid report that you didn’t appear to be eligible. We’re happy to let you know that you are, in fact, eligible.’”
Tisa Silver Canady – the founder and president of the Maryland Center for Collegiate Wellness, a student financial aid professional and advocacy group – said eliminating questions from the FAFSA that are “not relevant” to a student’s financial position will help send more students to college with financial aid.
Canady said the FAFSA will likely have a greater effect on students who are applying for federal aid for the first time than students who are currently receiving federal financial aid – like Pell grants or Stafford loans – because those students have already demonstrated their eligibility.
“For students who are in the pipeline or thinking about going to school, this is something that could make things easier for them and also expand access to those who might have had that drug conviction,” Canady said.”

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Importance
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GW should have been prepared for the surge in COVID tests
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 28, 2021
“Earlier this month the University announced that community members will need to get tested for the coronavirus every 15 days instead of once per month. Students who do not get tests in time will have their access restricted to some buildings and facilities – but a shortage of testing appointments left students waiting days to schedule an appointment or get results back. The University finally added testing appointments at the Foggy Bottom Campus – a change that was absolutely necessary – but the University should have been prepared to conduct more tests before announcing the new twice-monthly testing policy.
Frustration with testing delays was widespread , with students finding themselves unable to book an appointment for a week even when faced with serious situations like roommates showing severe COVID-19 symptoms. Some students with symptoms bought their own take-home tests at CVS Pharmacy, which can cost up to $125, because no tests were available. That is an absolutely unreasonable amount of money for students to have to spend because the University could not do its job. Some who did not decide to buy their own test had to wait five to six days to be able to find an available slot at the Foggy Bottom testing center.
Now, after a week of chaos, the University is expanding the number of asymptomatic testing appointments to 2,600 per day. With this new expansion in capacity, the facility can accommodate 75 people every 15 minutes. Officials are also adding a standby line for asymptomatic tests, where students can walk in and get tested on a first-come, first-served basis. The University is also accepting external PCR coronavirus tests, as long as they’re legitimate , and planning on increasing the availability of symptomatic tests at the Colonial Health Center, possibly expanding to operate on the weekends.
But the burden of managing these expanded asymptomatic tests is mainly on one testing center, the medical trailer in Lot 3. The University offers four testing centers but because 75 percent of undergraduate students live on campus, the medical trailer in Lot 3 and the Colonial Health Center are the main accessible testing centers for students and faculty members. Even so, the CHC only offers tests to symptomatic students and faculty, leaving the medical trailer to be the only available testing center for students without symptoms on Foggy Bottom.
The University should consider options like expanding testing centers to local medical centers in addition to accepting external PCR tests. Administrators should also explore ways of reimbursing those students who had to pay for their own coronavirus tests, because having to foot the bill for a test that costs up to $125 because of poor logistical planning by GW is unacceptable. Officials should cooperate with local hospitals to distribute a reasonable number of appointments at each testing center so students can not only can get tested, but also receive results back on time. The University should also consider granting conditional late exemptions for students whose appointment schedule collides with class time.
Students should also do their part and not ditch their appointments. No-shows are reported to be more than 100 per day – those are spaces that could have been filled by someone who needs a test. Students can cooperate with the University and medical staff by minimizing no-shows and following coronavirus safety protocols. With the expected increase in appointment availability in the CHC, symptomatic students must immediately get tested by booking with the students with coronavirus symptoms option.
The University is not experiencing a coronavirus crisis, but it does have a fair few cases – which is somewhat concerning. Although the cases have been decreasing since their peak on Sept. 8, with 45 positive cases on one day, cases have generally been ticking up since August. The University should have foreseen a need for more testing and built up the testing capacity accordingly before sending students scrambling. Now that the University has belatedly expanded testing, it needs to consider further steps like affiliating with non-GW testing centers or granting conditional exceptions. The last thing we want is another lockdown and return to virtual classes – and an outbreak that would send us back to that status could be exacerbated by students not being able to get tested if they have been exposed to the coronavirus. The University made a mistake and has taken the first steps to fix it. To prevent outbreaks on campus and a return to virtual instruction, it’s imperative that officials take every measure possible to ensure community members have adequate testing.
Yeji Chung, a Junior, majoring in political science, is an opinions writer.”

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Importance
1
SafeRide expansion exemplifies effective collaboration between SA and officials
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 28, 2021
“SafeRide is coming to the West End, DuPont Circle and the Lincoln Memorial. After advocacy from the Student Association, the program that offers rides for students to get across campus if they feel unsafe or unable to get home is expanding to three off-campus locations. The SA has been working with administrators for months on this expansion, and their efforts now mean that more students will have the option to call a ride if they find themselves feeling unsafe as they travel home. The policy exemplifies how the SA and administrators can collaborate on issues that impact students despite tensions between students and officials.
Students complained that SafeRide, previously known as 4-RIDE, had several issues that had little to do with the distance the service covered. Some had complained of unwelcoming drivers and long wait times, and one student had even reported unwanted romantic advances from a driver. In the reincarnation of 4-RIDE as SafeRide in 2019, the University updated the GW Rider app so that students could track each SafeRide vehicle. Previously, the app only showed the schedules of the Vern Express and Virginia Science and Technology Campus shuttles.
The new policy is a heartening step in the right direction. With the expansion of SafeRide into off-campus neighborhoods, students can feel safe knowing they have a reliable resource to get out of unsafe situations. Between social events, late-night Gelman Library study sessions or fitting errands into a busy college schedule, there are plenty of reasons why someone could find themself needing to get home late but feeling unsafe. If any of these everyday activities involves walking in dimly lit areas or being followed, then students who live both near and far from campus should have the option of a SafeRide.
GW’s campus and Foggy Bottom tend to be fairly safe places, but in the year 2019 there were still more than 1,000 crimes reported to GW Police Department, with nearly 50 of those reports being for stalking or sexual assault. Even still, the number of crimes does not account for people, especially women, feeling unsafe or threatened. This could be an even bigger consideration for people who live further from campus, including in the many apartment buildings in the West End or DuPont Circle. The long walk back home means more time in a less controlled and less familiar environment. Even if the overall risk of someone’s safety being violated is relatively low, it is still not zero, and people do not deserve to have to feel threatened making their way to or from campus.
But people will only use SafeRide if they know about it, and if its use is normalized as a legitimate and common option for staying safe. This is especially important given the tepid attitudes that students seem to have had about SafeRide and its predecessor 4-RIDE program. The University and the SA should widely publicize this change and highlight its benefits to ensure students know to take advantage of its benefits.
But students also have a responsibility to only use the service when necessary. Not wanting to walk home alone, feeling unsafe or being too intoxicated to make it home safely are examples of reasons to take SafeRide. But people should not be hailing a SafeRide car just because they don’t feel like walking halfway across campus for no other reason. If people frivolously use the expanded SafeRide for convenience rather than out of necessity, it will cause people who are hailing one of the cars for a legitimate safety reason to wait longer to get picked up, almost defeating the purpose of SafeRide. Officials have noted that SafeRide is currently understaffed due to a national driver shortage – GW should consider what options they have to bring on more drivers to ensure the service works in a timely way, so the onus is not just on students to keep wait times down.
The SA and administrators have been collaborating on the SafeRide expansion since the summer. Both the SA and the GW officials they worked with deserve credit – in a productive, non-antagonistic fashion, they worked together to deliver for the student body. SA Vice President Kate Carpenter deserves special praise here – she spearheaded the effort, and in helping to make this happen, is fulfilling a campaign pledge of hers to actualize small changes that make a substantial difference.
The relationship between the student body and administrators is generally a frosty, standoffish one. Most of the antipathy students hold toward officials broadly is well-founded, with many members of the community feeling like the issues they care about have not been addressed. Being able to make constructive criticism of the University, like the SA often does, while simultaneously working closely with individual administrators on specific issues seems like an incredibly productive and responsible approach to student advocacy that the SA is uniquely suited to undertake.
When endorsing SA candidates, including Carpenter, the Editorial Board noted the importance of delivering on campaign promises and working meaningfully with the University. In this case, Carpenter and the SA have done great work in that area. As a result of their constructive engagement with administrators, more students will have a way to get back to their residence halls or apartments safely if they are ever in a situation where they feel unsafe or in need of assistance. Not only is this a positive outcome for students, but it shows how the SA can and should continue to deliver for the GW community through productive dialogue with officials.
The editorial board consists of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s staff editorial was written by opinions editor Andrew Sugrue and contributing opinions editor Shreeya Aranake, based on discussions with culture editor Anna Boone, contributing sports editor Nuria Diaz, design editor Grace Miller, copy editor Jaden DiMauro and assistant copy editor Karina Ochoa Berkley.”

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Importance
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Crime log: Spouse of staff member carjacked by male suspect
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 28, 2021
“Theft II/From Building
Mitchell Hall (7-Eleven)
9/20/2021 – 7:44 p.m.
Open Case
GW Police Department officers responded to a report of theft. Upon arrival, officers made contact with a female employee who said a male subject stole orange juice from the store.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building
Duquès Hall
9/16/2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Open Case
Two male staff members reported basic tools, like wrenches and screwdrivers, stolen from their lockers.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building
University Student Center
9/21/2021 – 2:25 p.m.
Open Case
A staff member reported her purse stolen after leaving it in the University Student Center restroom. The purse contained basic items like an ID, wallet and credit cards.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building, Unlawful Entry
Mitchell Hall (7-Eleven)
9/21/2021 – 6:19 p.m.
Open Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of theft. Upon arrival, officers made contact with the complainant, who stated that a male subject who had previously been barred from campus had stolen multiple cell phone chargers.
– Case open.
Unlawful Entry
Mitchell Hall (7-Eleven)
9/21/2021 – 9:04 p.m.
Closed Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of a previously barred male subject entering the store after stealing cell phone chargers. Upon the officers’ arrival, the subject fled the scene and officers later apprehended and arrested him. EMeRG responded and transported the subject to the GW Hospital emergency room.
– Subject barred.
Theft II/From Motor Vehicle
2028 G Street/LLC (Garage)
9/22/2021 – 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Open Case
A staff member reported money stolen from his vehicle.
– Case open.
Armed Carjacking
Off Campus
9/22/2021 – 9:43 p.m.
Closed Case
An armed male subject carjacked the spouse of a staff member. Shortly thereafter, Metropolitan Police Department officers recovered the vehicle in Northeast.
– Referred to MPD.
Unlawful Entry
Science and Engineering Hall (Garage)
9/22/2021 – 11:48 p.m.
Closed Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of a female subject asleep in the garage. Upon arrival, they discovered that the subject had been previously barred from campus property. The subject was issued an updated bar notice and escorted off GW property.
– Subject barred.
– Compiled by Carly Neilson.”

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Importance
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Student Court sets hearing for first-year senator case
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 27, 2021
“Updated: Sept. 28, 2021 at 10:26 a.m.
The Student Court will hear a challenge next month to Student Association Senate legislation establishing a fall referendum that could reinstate first-year senate seats, the court ordered Sunday.
The order schedules a hearing on Oct. 10 as part of proceedings for the SA Office of Legislator General’s lawsuit against SA Vice President Kate Carpenter, Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and senate chairperson pro tempore, and Sen. Chris Pino, CCAS-U and the legislation’s sponsor. Justices unanimously denied two motions from Pino to dismiss the complaint and to seal part of his accompanying argument, saying Pino’s motion to dismiss indicated a misunderstanding of the SA’s governing documents and citing a need to maintain transparency with the student body in opposing his motion to seal.
“We find the Defendants’ arguments to be unavailing because they misunderstand the language of our governing documents and case law or otherwise highlight the nature of the issues precisely requiring review and adjudication by this Court,” the order reads.
The legislator general’s office  filed a complaint earlier this month seeking to prevent a referendum in which students would vote on whether the SA should bring first-year seats back to the senate after the positions were scrapped in a court ruling last November.
Pino, who motioned to dismiss the case last week, argued in his motion that the court lacks jurisdiction over the case because the student body has not yet voted to adopt any referenda as constitutional amendments. He argued that the court only has jurisdiction over “actions successfully taken” to amend the constitution, not those that may be taken in the future.
The court rejected this argument, stating that justices can rule on legislative action the senate has taken, including the special resolution to set a fall referendum.
“Defendants’ allusion to the need for acts to fall within some novel specialized action-dependent category of ‘constitutional actions’ for this Court to have jurisdiction have no textual, historical, legal or any other practical basis, and we therefore reject these arguments in their entirety,” the order states.
Pino contended that the legislator general office’s representation of the SA’s executive branch against its legislative branch breaks from the SA’s constitution, which he said mandates representation of the SA as a whole. Justices also rejected this argument, calling it a “live constitutional dispute” that the court should hear.
Justices also dismissed Pino’s motion to seal a portion of his motion for dismissal because students should not be “deprived” of information from the student government. Pino wrote in his motion that his reason for keeping that portion redacted was to protect the “identities and records” of the involved parties given his arguments’ “sensitive nature.”
The order states that sealing documents must be done “sparingly and judiciously” when considering the likelihood of harm to the parties involved and the circumstances of each case.
“To permit sealing otherwise would hamper students in making informed judgments regarding the competence and diligence of their student government – including this very Student Court – as it theoretically goes about faithfully representing their interests to the University administration and wider community,” the order reads.
The court  released the un-redacted version of Pino’s argument, which states that the legislator general’s office’s complaint attempts to advance a “frivolous” personal and political agenda at the request of SA President Brandon Hill. Pino alleges in the unsealed motion that Hill instructed the legislator general’s office to file a complaint against the referendum to block the senate’s push to implement first-year senate elections.
Pino said in the unsealed motion that Hill is using the judicial system to advance his policy agenda while “hiding” behind the legislator general’s office. He said Hill repeatedly argued against and threatened to veto first-year senator legislation in public and private meetings.
“This Complaint is step one of a bad-faith plan that seeks to autocratically undermine elections, the bedrock of democratic representation and aggrandize Executive power,” Pino said in the motion.
Hill originally said at the senate meeting earlier this month that he opposed holding the referendum and was prepared to seek the court’s opinion.
Hill did not return a request for comment.
Pino said in a statement that he agrees with the court’s decision to dismiss his motion to keep part of his argument sealed, and students have a right to access documents related to this case. He said he is “pleased” the court will determine the legality of Hill’s and the legislator general’s involvement in the complaint, and he hopes the court’s decision will allow for the return of first-year senators.
“I look forward to further court proceedings, where I will advance and substantiate the case for first-year representation as envisioned in the First-Year Senators Amendment Act,” Pino said.
The order states that the plaintiffs and defendants must submit briefs to the court by Sunday at 5 p.m., answering questions about the constitutionality of elections for first-year senators and the legislator general’s representation of the SA. “Any individual or organization” can also submit briefs to Chief Justice Yun-Da Tsai by Wednesday, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. to participate in the oral argument, according to the order.
Assistant Legislator General Andrew Harding said members of the office “welcome” the court’s decision to reject Pino’s motions to dismiss the complaint and seal parts of his argument.
“We appreciate the court sharing our strongly held belief that students deserve a transparent government, while unanimously denouncing the defendants’ attempts to conceal arguments from the public,” Harding said in a statement.
Carpenter, the SA’s vice president, said she will not take an official stance on either side of the case, and she hopes the SA can still advocate for the student body despite the ongoing debate. She said the SA and student body must maintain transparency through the court case and outside of the judicial proceedings.
“It is our obligation to maintain an approachable governing body,” Carpenter said in a statement. “Therefore, we must inform all of the decisions we make.”
Scales, the senate chairperson pro tempore, did not return a request for comment.
The court also extended its injunction blocking the SA’s special elections committee from scheduling any fall referenda until the reading of the court’s final judgment. The court will live-stream arguments from the hearing on social media, according to the order.
This post has been updated to clarify the following:
This post has been updated to clarify that Pino supports the court’s decision to dismiss his motion to redact part of his argument.”

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Importance
1
SA textbook exchange program to alleviate costs: students
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 27, 2021
“Students said a centralized location for used and online textbooks could alleviate yearly expenses as the Student Association prepares to kickstart its online textbook exchange program.
The SA Senate voted last week to establish a textbook exchange program for students to buy or trade through Google Sheets, where users can view textbooks available for rent or purchase from other students. More than 10 students said the initiative could help them locate less expensive alternatives to textbooks instead of spending hundreds of dollars on new class materials each semester.
SA Sen. Gabriel Young, CCAS-U,  who sponsored the Hippo Community Library resolution  said the textbook exchange portal would help students connect with each other and either lend or sell their books after struggling to pay expensive textbook prices from markets like the GW Campus Store or Amazon. He said he hopes the Hippo Library could be available for students to use by the upcoming spring semester.
“There are some people who do not even have a job, or they’re using their work-study funds to just pay off for school,” Young said. “This will allow students to save money and put money back into students’ pockets.”
Young said members of the SA’s undergraduate education policy committee will post a Google Form link next month to the SA’s social media for students to submit their textbooks, post their selling points and share their contact information. SA members will then transfer the form’s data to a Google spreadsheet that all students can view and use to contact the person selling the book they hope to buy, he said.
Young said he drafted the resolution to address a few complaints he heard about textbook affordability in conversations with students during his office hours since last year. He said the financial aid office’s  website states that students – especially those in STEM programs like biology or neuroscience – may spend upwards of $1,400 per semester on textbooks and school supplies, which may not be affordable for the average student.
He said each box in the spreadsheet will state the associated class for each textbook, links to online PDFs and contact information for students willing to give away these textbooks. He said centralizing textbook resources will help students save time typically spent on finding required reading for class.
“I want this to be a resource that is continually updated so that students in the future will be able to use it, and it will be a good system for future academic people to use as well,” he said.
More than 10 students said the spreadsheet’s features, like information about used textbooks and free PDFs, could help them avoid costly textbook prices as they work to seek out more affordable ways to obtain class materials.
Sophomore Natalia Perez, an international affairs major, said she has searched through Reddit for free textbook links and asked her friends to borrow materials to avoid paying for costly textbook prices. She said even with financial assistance from her parents, paying high prices for textbooks that she’ll only use for six months is hard to justify.
She said the SA’s online community library will ease the process of finding free online textbook alternatives and pinpointing affordable options.
“Sometimes it’s hard to get them or it takes so much time to ship or they’re too expensive,” Perez said. “So trying to find cheaper alternatives is hard.”
Sophomore Sara Ragsdale, a philosophy major, said paying for textbooks forces her to make “difficult” budgeting decisions, like whether she can buy groceries. She said in addition to the community library, professors could assign more affordable materials and fewer textbooks to alleviate some of the costs, citing classes that require students to purchase almost 10 books in total.
‘“A lot of it is sort of the professors – I have two classes that require nine textbooks apiece, and that is absurd,” Ragsdale said.
Freshman Keely Busby, who is majoring in American studies, said they spent nearly $200 on textbooks for a single class this semester. They said they would like to see professors make required textbooks, specifically workbooks, more readily available online, through systems like the Hippo Community Library.
“If there’s a workbook, they can make that available to us through the campus website or University Student Center or the library,” Busby said.
Senior Lauren Lafond, a political science major, said she struggled to buy textbooks in the past because professors prefer newer editions, which are often more expensive than previous versions. She said purchasing used textbooks, which are often cheaper than new ones, can sometimes be a challenge if a professor requires an edition released more recently.
She said officials offering more textbooks for rent through Gelman Library would make them more accessible for students. She said the Hippo Community Library will not impact her much since she is a senior and it won’t go into effect until the spring, but it’s a great idea to alleviate textbook costs among students.
“It’s just something that you have to plan ahead of, and it’s challenging when professors don’t post syllabuses or things like that until right before school starts,” Lafond said. “So it’s definitely harder to get textbooks in advance and put aside money for them.””

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Importance
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SA finance committee should be more transparent
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 27, 2021
“Each year, the Student Association’s finance committee allocates about $1.6 million of SA fees to various student organizations. Without them, many student organizations and campus events – from the fall comedy show hosted by the Program Board to EMeRG, which provides free emergency medical services to GW students – could not operate. Unfortunately, the committee works largely under a veil of obscurity. In violation of the SA’s  bylaws requiring that “minutes, agendas, committee documents, and other materials” be made public and the repeated promises of SA leaders to increase transparency, students will search in vain for any documents that shed light on the decisions of the finance committee – or any committee for that matter. As a result, students have practically no insight into how and why their money is spent.
This is tragic in two senses. Not only does it deny students the transparency that they deserve, it also denies the SA the opportunity to showcase the efforts of its most impactful committee. With students back on campus and student organization activity warming back up, there is no better time for the SA, and specifically, the finance committee, to make good on its pledges of transparency and release the documents, like committee minutes, necessary for compliance with its bylaws.
The SA has reaffirmed its commitment to transparency for more than a decade , and for good reason. Transparency and responsibility are crucial traits in any government, student or otherwise. Particularly when dealing with the allocation of such a large amount of student money. But despite all these promises, the SA rarely, if ever, makes concrete steps to improve transparency, which is why you still can’t find publicly available committee documents.
The shift toward greater transparency should start with the finance committee. It is both the most important committee in terms of the everyday impact it has on the lives of students, and the committee with the most resources to create publicly readable and available committee minutes.
It is a shame it hasn’t happened yet because students deserve to know the process that granted $137,590 to the Student Bar Association in 2020 fiscal year, and another $101,535 to the Medical Center Student Council. These amounts dwarf nearly every other allocation. There are good procedural reasons for these allocations. They are two of six organizations that represent entire graduate schools, and the finance committee is obligated to give them 100 percent of the student association fees from the students of these schools. But I only know that because I was present when this was discussed. On its own, one may think it odd or even suspicious that .05 percent of the orgs are receiving 20 percent of the general allocations budget, and even on its own, this policy is not above criticism.
Technically, most of the committees are open to the public. But this alone is woefully insufficient to meet the burden of transparency. First, the finance committee meetings sometimes last more than four hours and can continue past midnight. Accordingly, most people can’t find the time to attend the finance committee meetings live, and require a readable account of the meeting. Second, the Zoom meeting links for the finance committee are not made publicly available, but rather, one must first email the chair of the committee to get a link. This wrongly places the burden of transparency on students and is more broadly indicative of a lack of effort and care in providing a sufficient level of transparency.
The reason why committee minutes, finance or otherwise, haven’t been released to the public likely doesn’t have anything to do with maleficent senators gleefully misappropriating 1.6 million dollars in student funds. Rather, it’s more out of embarrassment for how bad the committee minutes have been in prior years.
I joined the finance committee my freshman year because I thought I could help make the committee more transparent. But, committee aides lacked guidance, access to feedback, and sufficient manpower. Above all, we lacked a coherent procedure. Results were predictable. The minutes could hardly be deciphered by those who had not attended the meetings in person. These problems plagued virtually all other committees and had persisted for years, which is why you don’t see meeting minutes from any other committee either.
But by the second semester, we had learned enough to realize and fix these problems. We brought on another two aides, started recording the meetings, and developed an effective procedure. Within a relatively short period of time, we had thorough, readable and accessible committee minutes that could be released to the public. Then the pandemic hit and dashed those immediate aspirations, but there’s no reason this kind of effort can’t happen again, and there’s never been a better time.
We wanted to make these minutes public because although the meetings are frequently chaotic due to a generally loose enforcement of rules of order during discussion and voting, the committee itself asks questions, deliberates and makes decisions in a manner fitting for a committee with such an important responsibility.
But just because this was true when I was a finance committee aide doesn’t mean it will always be true. Students have a right to see the decision-making process of the finance committee and determine if they have stopped making good decisions. Perhaps of most concern to the SA itself, denying students transparency will only continue to eat away at student’s trust in the SA. We saw some of the results of this lack of trust when Justin Diamond ran in 2019 on the platform of abolishing the SA entirely and gained a full third of the student vote. The current trajectory of the SA will not dissuade more students from voting for someone like Diamond in the future.
I am asking the SA to stop breaking the existing transparency clauses within its bylaws. Specifically, bylaw 501 section 2, requiring SA minutes to be released to the public. That’s a necessary but insufficient step to rebuilding student trust. The road to transparency and student trust is long, and won’t be finished by the SA merely fulfilling its written obligations. But it’s a relatively easy first step. The SA has reason to be proud of the finance committee. It does good work. Let students in on that secret as well.
Sam Swinson, a junior majoring in political science, is an opinions writer.”

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Importance
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Townhouse Row residents set to return next week
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 25, 2021
“Townhouse Row residents will return to their residential buildings on campus next week nearly a month after they were relocated  to local hotels because of water leaks and mold growth in their rooms.
The University scheduled returning students’ move-in dates for Monday, Wednesday and Friday of next week after True North, a licensed mold assessment company, completes air quality tests and provides written clearances for residents to reoccupy the townhouses, according to an email sent to residents and their families Friday and obtained by The Hatchet. The air quality inspections took place Wednesday and Thursday and will continue Monday and Tuesday, according to the email issued by the Division for Safety and Facilities and the Division for Student Affairs.
“We want you to know once again that we really appreciate your patience and understanding through this situation,” the email reads. “We realize that your temporary move was sudden and unexpected, and it has altered your back-to-school routines greatly.”
About 175 students living in Townhouse Row have spent the last three weeks living in hotels off campus after they were evacuated earlier this months when officials received reports of “environmental concerns” in the buildings. Some building residents said they visited the hospital after experiencing cold- and flu-like symptoms, like nasal congestion, fevers and fits of coughing up blood, earlier this month after spotting mold growth in their rooms on campus
The email states that True North completed air quality tests in the townhouses belonging to Sigma Chi and Alpha Phi, and residents in those buildings may return Monday.
Officials established “tentative” move-in slots for residents in Beta Theta Pi and Alpha Delta Pi scheduled for Wednesday following testing that was completed Thursday, according to the email. Officials said they will confirm the move-in dates for these chapters by Monday.
The University also assigned Friday as a tentative move-in date for members of Sigma Kappa, Kappa Delta, the National Pan-Hellenic Council and Sigma Delta Tau, whose buildings will be tested Monday and Tuesday, the email states. Officials said they will confirm Friday’s move-in by Wednesday.
Building clearance notification may take two to three days after air quality testing, according to the email. The email states that professional movers will help residents transport their belongings from the hotels back to Townhouse Row.
Inspectors contacted by the University previously discovered water damage and mold throughout Townhouse Row, according to a separate email sent to building residents last week and obtained by The Hatchet. The water damaged ceiling boards and wallboards in the buildings, where True North employees also detected mold growth following thermal imaging and moisture analysis, the email states.
The email states officials would remove the ceiling boards and wallboards and check the space behind them for any more potential water damage or mold growth, which would be “abrasively cleaned” with an “anti-microbial agent” and a vacuum equipped with a high efficiency particulate air filter.
“While findings varied in each townhouse, True North has identified multiple areas of water damaged wallboards and ceiling boards, which in some cases have been impacted by suspected mold growth,” the email reads. “These wallboards and ceiling boards will be removed and the space behind them inspected for any additional water damage and mold growth.””

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Importance
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Officials expanding COVID testing availability after student concerns
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 25, 2021
“Officials are creating a standby line for asymptomatic COVID-19 testing and will soon offer weekend symptomatic tests after students raised concerns about appointment availability.
Administrators said the new standby line at the Foggy Bottom asymptomatic testing trailer will be available for individuals with an “urgent” need to access campus who could not make an appointment. Officials are offering 2,600 asymptomatic COVID-19 testing appointments per day.
“The standby line is not a replacement to making an appointment,” officials wrote in the email. “If you access the standby line, please be prepared to wait longer than you normally would for a routine surveillance test.”
The announcement to expand COVID-19 testing comes after students said they faced extended delays for scheduling appointments. The University doubled its testing requirement for vaccinated individuals earlier this month, requiring students to be tested every 15 days to continue accessing campus.
Officials also announced students can now submit external PCR test results in lieu of using GW’s in-house testing center.
For GW to accept the test results, officials said students should submit results in the Colonial Health Center portal no later than two days before their next required test date. The external lab must be approved by federal health officials under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, and officials will not accept rapid antigen tests.
Officials said symptomatic testing at the CHC will soon include weekend hours, but it remains unclear when the expanded hours will go into effect.”

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Importance
1
SA president vetoes bill amending senate elections
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 25, 2021
“Student Association President Brandon Hill vetoed a bill Thursday that would codify two referenda into the SA’s bylaws if they are approved by the student body.
The SA Senate approved  scheduling the two referenda at a meeting earlier this month to ask students if the SA should create and hold elections for first-year senate seats each fall and if the SA should implement a plurality voting system for senate races with multiple seats instead of ranked choice voting. Hill said in a statement to SA Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and senate chairperson pro-tempore, that he vetoed the Fall Senate Elections Act because it “disregards” the SA’s governing documents and would give unequal representation to first-year students in the senate.
Hill said at the senate meeting that he was opposed to the referenda because of concerns over low turnout during potential fall elections.
The SA’s Office of the Legislator General filed a complaint against the first-year senators resolution with the Student Court last week, arguing it grants disproportionate representation to first-year students. The court issued a preliminary injunction this week to block the SA’s special elections committee from establishing any referenda until Monday while the justices decide whether the complaint warrants further action.
Hill said in the statement that he will continue to advocate for “equal and equitable” representation for all students. He said he will continue to collaborate with the senate to represent the University, but he opposes the legislation.
“Any effort to correct injustices of inequitable representation must be within governing doctrines; the Act does not satisfy these standards,” Hill said.
The senate can override a presidential veto with at least a two-thirds vote, according to the SA constitution. The senate previously passed the legislation by unanimous consent, signaling the veto could be overridden if no votes change.
Hill said at the senate meeting earlier this month that he opposed holding any fall referendum, saying that more students should be involved with changing the constitution rather than just those who would choose to vote in the referenda.
“As we all continue to navigate the COVID-19 public health crisis and, more recently, ongoing environmental concerns on campus, now is not the right time to call for a referendum,” Hill said in the veto message. “Given the already low turnout for referenda, we should seek to hear the voices of all students, not just a select few.”
Hill did not return a request for comment.
SA Sen. Chris Pino, CCAS-U and the sponsor of the legislation that Hill vetoed, said Hill’s veto is “disappointing” and unnecessary because the bill only goes into effect if the student body approves the referenda. He said he expects the senate to override the veto at its next meeting.
“The bill doesn’t go into effect unless the fall referenda are approved by the student body, so the president’s veto does nothing but try to handicap a student body mandate from going into effect,” Pino said.”

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Male driver carjacked near Shenkman Hall
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 25, 2021
“Police officers responded to an armed carjacking near Shenkman Hall Wednesday night, according to a Metropolitan Police Department report.
The report states an unidentified subject pointed a handgun at a man driving a Chevrolet Trax at the intersection of Virginia Avenue and 24th Street at about 9:44 p.m., ordering him to exit the car. The driver – a man from Silver Spring, Maryland – complied with the demands before the subject drove off in the vehicle from the intersection located outside the Remington Apartments, according to the report.
MPD spokesperson Alaina Gertz said the car involved in the incident was located and recovered later that night. She said the investigation is still open and community members should contact police if they know any details about the incident.
“Anyone who has knowledge of this incident should take no action but call police at (202) 727-9099 or text your tip to the Department’s TEXT TIP LINE at 50411,” she said in an email.
Officials issued a GW Alert Wednesday night at about 10:05 p.m. to advise students to avoid the area before sending out a notice about 40 minutes later, clarifying that police had cleared the scene.
University spokesperson Crystal Nosal declined to comment on the incident, deferring to the Metropolitan Police Department.”

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Community members, experts say CCST contact tracing notifications lack details
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 24, 2021
“After COVID-19 cases reached an all-time high on campus earlier this month, some community members are saying the University’s contact tracing system is missing details like the time and location of potential exposures.  
Megan Landry – the project director of the CCST, a team made up of public health professionals in the Milken Institute School of Public Health – said contact tracers interview community members who test positive for the virus about who they were in contact with and then notify those people with information about how to get tested and any quarantining requirements. Professors and students who’ve received notifications from CCST about coming in contact with COVID-19 said they’ve received exposure emails a few days after community members have individually told them they tested positive and that exposure notifications exclude details about the location and specific time they could have been exposed.
“We are constantly monitoring cases and requesting additional support where needed,” Landry said in an email. “We need everyone to fight ‘COVID fatigue’ and continue with public health safety measures.”
Landry said officials designate someone as a close contact if they were within six feet of a person with COVID-19 for more than 15 minutes, regardless of whether they were wearing a mask.
COVID-19 cases and positivity rates on campus reached all-time highs earlier this month after in-person classes resumed for the first time since the start of the pandemic last March, according to GW’s COVID-19 testing dashboard .
Landry said fully vaccinated community members who are named as close contacts don’t need to quarantine but are required to get tested within three to five days following their exposure.
She said the team uses several databases and software programs to conduct contact tracing and determine close contacts within the past 48 hours of a positive case. She added that t he GW community needs to continue following public health safety measures on campus to limit the number of COVID-19 cases on campus. 
“We need the entire GW community to continue with public health safety measures and prevention practices such as wearing masks, hand washing and limiting social gatherings on and off campus to help stop the spread,” Landry said.
Illa Moskowitz, a professor of physics, said one of her students chose to voluntarily inform her that she tested positive for the virus, but there was “a rather large lapse” of time between the notification from her student and the CCST, who emailed her about the positive test a few days later.
Moskowitz said the CCST, not professors, should inform students in their classes if someone tests positive. She said she still encourages her students to stay home if they aren’t feeling well.
She said professors do not receive information about who in their class tests positive for the coronavirus and which class may have incited the exposure. She said the contact tracing system should keep this information confidential.
“The contact tracing I believe honestly is doing the best that they can on the circumstances to protect the privacy of the individuals involved and inform all the people that need to know that they may have possibly been exposed,” Moskowitz said.
Madeline Fischer, a sophomore studying international affairs, said emails she’s received from officials about potential exposure have only included the date of the potential exposure and excluded the time, event or location of close contact, information she said would be helpful for her to determine any exposure patterns in her day-to-day schedule.
“It didn’t tell me where, and I know that they are trying to protect maybe the person who tested positive, but then I don’t know which activities I’m doing that are risky,” Fischer said. “Is it my classes? Is it org meetings that I’m going to?”
Nicole Bartels, a teaching assistant professor of political science, said four students tested positive for COVID-19 in her classes this fall, but the University only notified her of one of these cases while the other three students told her independently that they tested positive. She said she would like the University to inform all students and the professor of a class if there is a positive case.
“On the contact tracing part there could be a little more clarity and transparency,” Bartels said. “I’m not 100 percent positive what some of the reasons or rationale are, and maybe it’s an information thing, or maybe they want to control how much or what people know.”
Medical experts said contact tracers can’t always determine each person who was in contact with someone who tested positive because students may not remember the details of who they were in contact with in each of their classes.
Megan Fitzpatrick, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Maryland’s Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, said implementing assigned seating in classrooms could help contact tracers monitor close contacts.
Fitzpatrick said GW’s decision to send campus members only the date of their exposure rather than the time and location is “airing way too much” on the side of privacy, but she said students can independently tell their professors and friends that they tested positive for the coronavirus.
“There can be an openness in the University culture to disclosing when you yourself have been infected,” she said.
Ronald Hershow, the director of the University of Illinois Chicago’s division of epidemiology and biostatistics, said contact tracers sometimes can’t determine who was exposed to the virus because they may miss the “granular information,” like where people were sitting in a class.
“We may recommend follow-up testing for the entire class, rather than a circumscribed, prescribed group of hyper-exposed people who were close to the index case and were close for more than 15 minutes,” he said.
Hershow said UIC’s contact tracers always contact professors before determining who was in close contact. He said contact tracers ask professors how close students were sitting in the classroom, which students worked together on group projects and whether students ever removed their masks to eat.
Hershow said GW’s decision to give vaccinated students who are close contacts three to five days to get tested is in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines . He said the likelihood of vaccinated students spreading the coronavirus before they get tested is low.
“Among vaccinated students, the likelihood of that happening is much lower than it is for unvaccinated students,” he said. “We therefore have differential guides for the vaccinated group versus the unvaccinated group.”
Nicholas Pasion contributed reporting.
Tracking COVID-19
Stay up to date on GW, D.C. news related to the virus. READ MORE”

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Professors must enforce mask mandate to continue in-person classes
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 24, 2021
“When administrators decided in-person classes would return this fall, it was understood that strict adherence to COVID-19 policies was the only way to confidently make that decision. Among these, of course, included frequent testing , a vaccine requirement , and a  mask mandate for all indoor spaces. From my observation, some students take these requirements very seriously, even wearing masks on their outdoor walks between classes. Others seem to be taking the partial return to normalcy for granted by not following our campus’s coronavirus policies. From class to class, adherence to the mask mandate is generally inconsistent. I’m sure most of us have seen instances around campus where students wear masks below their noses or simply don’t realize it may have fallen while they’re speaking. I’ve seen it my fair share of times. GW’s coronavirus  guidelines allow professors to remove their masks if they’re six feet away from students, but I’ve seen some remove their masks for lectures in classrooms that are too small for proper distancing. 
When a professor breaks the mask mandate, their students and peers are able to report the incident to the provost’s office. But when a student breaks the mandate, there is no real system of accountability in place. For this reason, officials should require professors to enforce coronavirus policies in their classrooms and reprimand students who repeatedly ignore them. When the reopening plan was first rolled out over the summer, hopes were high that vaccines would make mask-wearing virtually unnecessary. During this time, guidance was issued to professors that the University would be “open” and in such a scenario, professors were not to ask students to wear masks in the classroom. But since that guidance was issued, the University has reinstated its mask mandate and shifted its operating status to “open with precautions,” which resulted in increased testing frequency, limited guests on campus, and quarantine protocols for infected staff and students. This new operating status should include the ability for professors to enforce mask mandates in their classrooms and a set of tools professors and other students can use to crack down on students who repeatedly violate coronavirus protocols. The issue is more important now than ever. Colleges made the deliberate choice to return to campus despite concerns over the Delta variant, knowing that they may have to tighten policy to accommodate a rise in cases. Many colleges and universities chose to reinstate their mask mandates, a crucial preventative measure designed to keep students and faculty safe. But it seems that these measures have not been enough, as cases persist and enough concern has grown to warrant a shift to a twice-per-month testing requirement. Surely, if case rates get dire enough, GW may be forced to put an end to in-person instruction once again, as outlined in the reopening plan. To prevent this, it’s crucial to ensure strict adherence to the University’s coronavirus policy and protocols, creating the necessity for a robust enforcement and reporting system focused on professors. To achieve this, the University first needs to require professors to dole out consequences for not complying with the mandate. From there, professors should start with friendly reminders to adhere to policy for students who might let their mask fall below their nose, or forget to bring one to class. For those who continue to ignore mandates, professors should be free to report students for code of conduct violations, implement academic sanctions by lowering their grade if they don’t comply with the mandate or remove them from the class altogether. 
Should a professor fail to encourage adherence to policy in their classrooms, the same reporting method used to report professors not following mandates could also be used to report professors not enforcing them properly. Administrators certainly hold leverage over professors, and should reasonably be able to enforce this policy among faculty.  Some professors are already doing their part to enforce mask mandates. For instance, one of my professors included in their syllabus that they would deduct a portion of our grade each time a student didn’t wear their mask after being asked once. This tactic seems to work, as I have been unable to spot a single person in his class wearing their mask improperly, let alone not wearing one at all.
To some, this solution may seem extreme – but such a solution may become necessary should cases rise again as they did during orientation week or during the week of Sept. 6, when the GW’s COVID-19 dashboard showed a spike in the number of daily positive cases.  Fortunately, the case rate has declined since that uptick – ensuring mask mandate compliance will help keep it where it is now. 
Ideally, students should wear their masks properly without enforcement methods in place. But officials need to implement a structure to remind them of that policy, and if necessary, take disciplinary action for risking the health of their peers. The University must ask professors to take on this responsibility, and impose some harsh, albeit, necessary guidelines to ensure that the students and professors stay healthy enough to stay in class. ”

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Dish of the Week: Casta's Rum Bar's maduros envueltos en tocino
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 24, 2021
“With cigar smoke lingering around you, a rum cocktail in your hand and decor that pays homage to Cuba, dining at Casta’s Rum Bar feels like a tropical escape.
Tucked away beneath the West End Washington D.C. hotel at 1121 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Casta’s is a casual Cuban restaurant and rum bar just two blocks from campus. The late hours , a cigar menu , an all-day happy hour on Wednesdays and an all-day brunch menu on Sundays make this spot an ideal spot for students to frequent for a night out or celebration.
After checking in at the hostess stand at the door, you walk through a dark cement hallway into the main dining room where you’re welcomed by the yellow-ish glow of the dim lights and lively buzz of conversation. Exposed brick walls throughout the restaurant are painted with murals of scenes from Havana and the Cuban flag, and green palm plants scattered around compliment the tropical vibe.
Casta’s seats guests in the main dining room and a sunroom-like patio space in the back of the restaurant, both of which feature full bars.
Casta’s menu of small plates, sandwiches and desserts is relatively short, making it easy to choose which Cuban dish you want to try out.
For an appetizer to share with friends, the black hummus y mariquitas ($12), a black bean hummus and fruit salsa duo served with plantain chips, is a great choice. For a heartier appetizer, try the las borrachas ($18), which are barbeque pork ribs with a spicy rum sauce.
To give a traditional Cuban dish a try, order the classic Cuban sandwich ($15), a roast pork and glazed ham sandwich on Cuban bread with Swiss cheese, pickles and yellow mustard.
Growing up in Florida, authentic Cuban food was a regular part of my diet and my favorite dish has always been maduras – fried chunks of sweet plantains often served as a side dish. So when I picked up the menu at Casta’s, the maduros envueltos en tocino ($12) from the small plates section were my first choice.
The dish was served on a black, plank-like wooden plate atop a green leaf. Four chunks of soft sweet plantain pieces came wrapped in charred bacon with a creamy guava sauce underneath. To complete the appetizer, a pile of citrus-dressed greens were served on the side as a light and tangy contrast.
Plantains taste like a hybrid between yucca, starchy root plants eaten in Cuban cuisine, and bananas. The sweet flavor profile of bananas, plantain’s look-alike, comes through and is balanced by the savory and heartier elements similar to yucca. The maduros on this dish were just soft enough to enjoy without being too mushy to stay inside the bacon.
A tropical fruit essence came through in the guava sauce but was not overpowering and played well with other acidic and salty flavors in the sauce. Unsuspectingly, the lightly dressed green salad on the side was an appreciated bright addition to the dish.
The cocktails at Casta’s are its specialty so be sure to try out drinks like the frozen Havana vice ($12, or $10 during happy hour), a variation of a piña colada with the addition of strawberry or non-frozen cocktails like the el nacional ($12, or $10 during happy hour) with aged rum, apricot, pineapple and lime.
Whether you want a regular spot near campus to enjoy drinks with friends or are craving an immersive Cuban experience, Casta’s Rum Bar is the place for you.”

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Police arrest Sunrise GW members at Capitol protest
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 23, 2021
“Updated: Sept. 23, 2021 at 10:47 a.m.
More than a dozen protesters, several of them GW students, were arrested near the U.S. Capitol Monday while advocating for federal investments in renewable energy, public transit, public housing and schools.
A spokesperson for USCP said officers arrested 13 protesters outside of the Hart and Dirksen senate office buildings and charged them with “crowding, obstructing or incommoding” public building entrances after  Sunrise GW helped lead about 80 people from Washington Circle to the Capitol. Demonstrators, also affiliated with American University’s Sunrise chapter, marched through the streets carrying signs reading “Green New Deal” and “Fight for a Livable Future” and said they hope the activism will help pass legislation that prioritizes climate protection.
Tara Stumpfl, Sunrise GW’s hub coordinator, said all of the detained protesters were GW students, who decided to engage in civil disobedience and “strategically” risk arrest to show legislators and bystanders their determination to enact policies that address climate change. Stumpfl said she hoped the protests would demonstrate that people have “a lot to lose” if officials don’t address climate change.
The Hatchet could not confirm the number of students arrested at the protest. The USCP spokesperson declined to release the identities of the individuals arrested at the demonstration.
“When we show what we are willing to sacrifice for this movement and for our futures, it makes people who are reading the story, who are seeing on the news or who are driving by or walking by our action, ask the question, ‘What is at stake here? What can I lose? Why are these people willing to put so much on the line for this?,’” she said.
Protesters marched along Pennsylvania Avenue from Washington Circle to the Capitol and stopped briefly near the White House to listen to short speeches from demonstrators. Dozens of USCP officers met the protesters near the Capitol and forced them to march on sidewalks instead of on the street.
Anthony Peltier | Staff Photographer
Police released the arrested protesters a few hours after they were detained, according to a tweet from Sunrise GW.
Stumpfl said the protest sought to apply pressure on moderate and conservative Democrats, like Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and urge them to pass a $3.5 billion spending plan  including investments that would significantly decrease carbon emissions. Sunrise has  protested  GW’s ties to fossil fuel companies for years, advocating for the closure of the Regular Studies Center and demanding divestment from the fossil fuel industry – a commitment that GW eventually made last June.
“The goal is to tell conservative Democrats to choose us over Exxon and ask them the question, ‘Which side are you on?’ and demand that they pass the $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill to fight for climate, fight for renewable energy,” she said.
During speeches and chants, organizers and protesters also called for improved schools, public transit, public housing, immigration policy and the implementation of the Civilian Climate Corps, a proposed government agency that would employ young people to address climate change and maintain public land.
Ozzy Simpson, a member of Sunrise GW, said he was arrested by USCP officers outside of the Hart Senate Office Building while standing in a parking lot Monday. He said USCP officers used zip tie handcuffs to arrest him and five other protesters before they crossed the street to the building’s entrance.
Simpson said he paid $50 to “post and forfeit” so he could be released from jail without admitting guilt to “incommodation.”
Anthony Peltier | Staff Photographer
“It’s gotten to the point where just nicely asking, showing up in front of the White House, asking Biden or whatever, isn’t really enough at this point,” he said. “And we’ve tried that, and it doesn’t work, and so I think for me, it felt like it was time to put my body on the line.”
Simpson, a freshman from California, delivered a speech outside of the White House during the march to call on President Joe Biden to address the climate change that is intensifying wildfires in his state. In the speech, Simpson said he was tired of wondering whether his house would burn down because of wildfires and urged Democrats to take action against oil and fossil fuel companies that he believes are intensifying climate change.
“We’re counting on you, and we don’t have time to wait,” Simpson said.
This post has been updated to clarify the following:
This post has been updated to clarify that The Hatchet did not receive confirmation regarding the number of students arrested at the protest. This post was also updated to include a decline from the USCP spokesperson.”

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A guide to the District's farmer's market scene
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 21, 2021
“To spice up your weekly shopping run, check out D.C.’s farmer’s market scene for fresh and sustainable grocery options.
Supporting local and sustainable food practices can be hard on a college budget, but D.C.’s farmer’s market scenes provide plenty of options for students to try out. Most D.C. neighborhoods host their own markets, making local produce, meat and seafood, prepared food and flowers available to you throughout the week.
The next time you’ve got a free morning, check out one of these farmer’s markets around the city:
For specialty coffee and treats:
Columbia Heights FRESHFARM Market
Within walking distance of the National Zoo, this market is a great pit stop for lunch or to grab groceries for dinner post-sightseeing. Before visiting, place an order for Qualia coffee beans, which are roasted in-house every three days. Other vendors range from JustJuice smoothies to Jarabe Gourmet Pops artisan popsicles. Multiple produce vendors sell items like varied mushrooms, Alaskan salmon and assorted vegetables. Pre-order whole wheat sourdough ($7.50), jalapeño cheddar bread ($7) or vegan nutty apple cake ($6.50) from D.C.’s organic Ravenhook Bakehouse . Visit El Sabor del Taco food truck for tacos wrapped in a homemade tortilla and house mole sauce.
Park Rd. NW and 14th St. NW. Open Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Runs through Oct. 13.
For the Instagrammable farmers market:
FRESHFARM Dupont Circle Market
Founded in 1997, the Dupont Market houses 57 vendors and is packed from open to close every Sunday. Located in the heart of Dupont circle, this market is a walkable stop for groceries or a fun Sunday morning stop for coffee and a snack. You can also pick up goodies from the market and enjoy them with friends in the park around the Dupont fountain. Long lines in front of Zeke’s , Call Your Mother Deli and Little Austria bakery booths are often filled with college students, families and cute dogs. Pick up fresh dairy products from Clear Spring Creamery or Shepards Manor Creamery or a bucket of flowers from Wollam Gardens . Purchase fresh flaky Baklava ($15 for 6 pieces) from Mastiha Artisan Greek Bakery , which is only located at the Dupont market or browse the vibrant produce from Potomac Vegetable Farms .
1624 20th St. NW. Open Sundays 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Year-round.
To explore the city:
Brookland Monrow Street Farmer’s Market
Head out of Northwest D.C. and check out this 18-vendor market to find sweet treats and drinks to enoy your morning with. Founded in 2014, this market is a hub for residents in the Northeast to pick up local produce and sip on coffee. The next time you’re in Ward 5, check out this market for produce from Diaz Veggie and Berries, which supplies fruits and vegetables from a farm in Colonial Beach, Va., just 66 miles from the District. If you’re still feeling peckish, place your order at DMV empanadas, which got its start serving the savory pastry at the market in 2014 before opening its own storefront in Gaithersburg, Md. in 2019.
716 Monroe St NE. Open Saturdays 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Year-round .
For fresh fruits and veggies:
H Street Northeast Market
For a small but mighty array of fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables, head to H Street Northeast for the farmer’s market the next time you’ve got a free Saturday morning. Start the day by pursuing produce from Deep Roots Farm in Upper Marlboro, Md., which is just 20 miles from D.C., before grabbing a sweet treat at Caputo Brothers Creamery.  Close out your morning by grabbing a few bottles of hard cider for later in the night at Capitol Cider House.
800 13th St. NE. Open Saturdays 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Runs through Dec. 18. 
For the quick trip:
Palisades Farmers Market
Head to the Palisades neighborhood for this market that is organized and run entirely by the Palisades community. Though smaller than the markets in Dupont, more than 25 vendors selling both prepared food and fresh produce line the street. Groff’s Content Farm attracts market-goers interested in hormone- and antibiotic-free meat and eggs. Stroll through the market with a cup of Zeke’s cold brew or vegan Gemma Gelato . Finally, grab dumplings for an easy dinner from the Chinese Street Market .
48th Place NW and MacArthur Blvd NW. Open Sundays 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Year-round.”

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Crime log: Amazon packages stolen from West Hall loading dock
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 20, 2021
“Harassing Telephone Calls, Harassment (Verbal or Written)
Stuart Hall
9/13/2021 – Multiple
Open Case
GW Police Department officers responded to a report of a subject harassing GW community members. Upon arrival, GWPD officers made contact with a male faculty member, who reported that an unknown female subject had called and harassed him over the phone. Units swept the area but did not find the subject.
– Case open.
Harassment (Verbal or Written)
Mitchell Hall
9/14/2021 – 2:01 a.m.
Open Case
A male student reported being harassed by a female student after they had an argument about a relationship.
– Case open.
Theft II/From Building
West Hall (Pelham Commons)
9/14/2021 – Unknown
Open Case
A student reported her tote bag stolen after leaving it unattended in the dining hall. The bag contained IDs, money and a wallet.
– Case open.
Urinating or Defecating in Public
University Mall
9/15/2021 – 1:09 a.m.
Closed Case
While on routine patrol, GWPD officers observed an unknown female subject urinating in public. Officers issued the subject a bar notice and escorted her off GW property.
– Subject barred.
Threats to do Bodily Harm
Public Property On Campus (2200 Block of H Street NW)
9/15/2021 – 7:30 a.m.
Open Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of suspicious activity. Upon arrival, officers made contact with a female non-GW affiliated complainant who stated that an unknown male subject had threatened her. Officers canvassed the area but did not find the subject.
– Case open.
Theft II/Other
Mount Vernon Campus (West Hall)
9/15/2021 – Unknown
Open Case
Staff members reported packages stolen from the loading dock of West Hall. The packages were sealed Amazon boxes meant to be delivered to students and faculty.
– Case open.
Theft II/Bicycles
Public Property On Campus (2200 Block of I Street, NW)
9/15/2021 – 5:15 to 7:20 p.m.
Open Case
A student reported his bike stolen.
– Case open.
Theft II/Bicycles, Destruction of Property
University Yard
9/15/2021 – 5:30 to 9:40 p.m.
Open Case
GWPD officers responded to a report of a bicycle theft. Upon arrival, officers made contact with the student, who reported her cable lock had been cut and her bicycle stolen.
– Case open.
–  Compiled by Carly Neilson.”

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Lerner service expands with upswing in daily visitors
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 20, 2021
“Thousands of students are returning to the Lerner Health and Wellness Center after more than a year of limited reservations because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
University spokesperson Crystal Nosal said nearly 4,500 students have tapped into Lerner as of Friday for more than 15,000 visits since Aug. 23, after reservations and shorter workout sessions limited faculty operations last year while the campus population remained low during the coronavirus pandemic. She said officials are focusing on maintaining the cleanliness of the facility to soothe the concerns of people who may be hesitant to exercise indoors due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Nosal said nearly 1,000 students tap into Lerner every weekday, lower than pre-pandemic averages but significantly higher than earlier this year while reduced service restricted student access to the gym. She said more than 400 students tap into Lerner per day on the weekend, but they expect the rate of visitors to fall as exams and coursework increase students’ workloads.
“The center is busy with activity, and returning students have been eager to get back to a place they once often visited, and our students who are new to campus are figuring out what their semester routine will look like as they incorporate fitness into their schedules,” Nosal said in an email.
Nosal declined to say how many people visited Lerner daily before and during the pandemic.
She said D.C.’s coronavirus guidelines required Lerner to close from March 2020 until the fall semester that year, when officials started to allow on-campus students to schedule hourly workout blocks at the facility.
Nosal said Lerner and Housekeeping staff regularly clean and disinfect all surfaces in the gym, including fitness equipment, to maintain the building’s sanitation. She said officials provide disinfectant spray, cleaning wipes and paper towels to visitors and ask that people clean the equipment after every use.
“The cleanliness of the entire facility remains a very high priority for the Lerner team, so we continue to work closely with our Housekeeping team to do regular cleaning and disinfecting of all surfaces throughout the facility including the fitness equipment,” she said.
Nosal said Lerner workers regularly move through each floor of the building to enforce the masking policy and refer policy violations to Student Rights and Responsibilities.
She said officials are aiming to hire and train additional work-study students, who she said are necessary for the gym to fully operate, but Lerner is still several weeks away from reaching “optimal” student staffing levels.
Nosal said Lerner will continue to provide some online fitness courses, like virtual yoga and Zumba, and students can purchase a semester pass to weekly fitness courses for $79.
“While we know that many are excited to work out indoors at the gym, we do realize that some members of our community may still be hesitant about exercising indoors,” she said. “For that reason, we are providing a hybrid fitness schedule this fall with both in-person and virtual offerings, and the schedule can be found online.”
In interviews, ten students said officials are effectively enforcing the mask mandate through floor checks, but social distancing restrictions and equipment sanitation can be sometimes overlooked.
Freshman Vivian Ealy, who uses the gym three times a week, said she mostly feels safe working out at Lerner because students are required to be vaccinated and show their coronavirus  clearance status before they enter the building. But she worries that some people don’t clean the weightlifting equipment after each use, which she said can cause hygienic or coronavirus issues.
“We have to wipe down the equipment after we use it,” Vivian said. “I know some people don’t do that because you have to trust people to do that, so I’m not really sure if the equipment’s totally wiped every time.”
She also said the “small” size of the weightlifting room can make it difficult to fully respect the social distancing requirements.
“The weightlifting room is pretty small,” she said. “So when it’s really crowded everyone is packed in and breathing heavily and sweating, so that’s a little unsafe.”
Senior Katherine Phillips goes to Lerner several days a week, but she said the recent spike of coronavirus cases in the past two weeks concerns her, especially when the gym can become crowded. She said she was surprised the University didn’t continue requiring reservations for gym use like last year to help control potential crowding.
The University’s daily coronavirus caseload and positivity rate reached all-time highs earlier this month, with 45 cases and a 2.91 percent positivity rate, according to GW’s COVID-19 testing dashboard.
“The gym is really small, so I think there’s going to be some risk unless they start spreading things out, but then there wouldn’t be enough equipment for everyone,” she said. “They don’t really have a good option there, everything is really close together.”
Junior Taylor Barr said he feels safe working out in Lerner because staff enforces the mask mandate more strictly than in most classrooms as they patrol each floor and immediately tell students to wear their masks when someone takes it off.
“It’s probably better than a classroom honestly,” Barr said. “Because in some classes people have their mask below their nose, but there they have signs to specifically put your mask above your nose.”
Tracking COVID-19
Stay up to date on GW, D.C. news related to the virus. READ MORE”

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SA executive office files complaint on senate representation
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 18, 2021
“The Student Association Office of the Legislator General filed a complaint with the Student Court Friday, aiming to prevent a referendum that could bring back first-year seats to the SA Senate.
SA Legislator General Holden Fitzgerald and assistant legislator generals Juan Carlos Mora and Andrew Harding filed the complaint opposing the First-Year Senators Act, a special resolution the senate passed Monday to propose students establish first-year senator elections via a referendum. The complaint states that the special resolution violates SA governing documents by granting freshmen, first-year graduate students and first-year transfer students more representation than other students.
If approved, the referendum would have students vote in elections for first-year senators each fall. SA President Brandon Hill said at the meeting that he opposed the resolution and was prepared to seek the Student Court’s opinion.
The complaint states that the resolution violates the “essential representational equality” requirement in the University’s Statement on Student Rights and Responsibilities. The plaintiffs argue that the special resolution lets the senate to grant more representation to any “political group” it wishes, allowing first-year students to be represented by both class-specific seats and school-specific seats.
“The Special Resolution amendment gives first-year students double representation by the proposed First-Year At-Large Senators and School Senators, while non-first-year students will be denied class-year representation,” the complaint reads. “It is imperative that this referendum not go forward due to this flagrant violation of the SSRR.”
The SA’s previous constitution, which was nullified in May when the body’s updated constitution went into effect, provided for the senate to appoint first-year undergraduate and graduate senators. These senate seats were converted to at-large seats after the senators served a full semester in the SA.
The court struck down all first-year undergraduate and graduate seats last year, stating that the appointing of first-year students to the seats violates the “essential representational equality” requirement of the student rights and responsibilities statement. The judgement did not rule out future apportionment methods using class year but said the senate “exceeded its authority” by appointing first-year students without an election.
The complaint states that the defendants attempted to address the issue of first-year overrepresentation by including a clause in the resolution explicitly stating that non-first-year senators do not represent first-year students and first-year senators do not represent non-first-year students. The plaintiffs allege that this statement fails to address the constitutional issue because students are automatically assigned to a school upon entering GW.
Harding, one of assistant legislator generals, said in a statement on behalf of the legislator general office that they “thoroughly” reviewed the first-year resolution before deciding to move forward with legal proceedings. He said the plaintiffs want to ensure “equal” and “fair” representation for all students through the complaint.
“Any effort to correct injustices of inequitable representation must be well warranted and within governing doctrines to ensure prospective questions of legality are mitigated,” the statement reads. “The OLG is committed to continuing its advocacy for equal representation.”
The complaint names SA Vice President Kate Carpenter, Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and senate chairperson pro-tempore, and Sen. Chris Pino, CCAS-U and the sponsor of the special resolution, as defendants of the complaint.
Carpenter and Pino did not immediately return requests for comment. Scales declined to comment.
The plaintiffs also filed a motion to stop the SA from forming a special elections commission to set a date for the referendum and from sending the referendum to students. The plaintiffs urged the court to accept their injunction and expedite their request given the urgency of the potential fall election schedule.
The complaint also contends that if the court were to invalidate the first-year resolution, justices should review the validity of the Proportional Representation Act and the Fall Senate Elections Act , which the senate also passed Monday.
The proportional representation resolution would send a referendum to students on the question of creating separate at-large undergraduate and graduate senate positions for the Milken Institute School of Public Health, School of Nursing, School of Medicine and Health Sciences and the College of Professional Studies. The senate elections act would update the SA’s bylaws to be in compliance with the first-year senators act if the student body approves that referendum.”

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GW Hospital sued for negligence before former patient's death
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 17, 2021
“The husband of a deceased former patient is suing the GW Hospital, the University and GW Medical Faculty Associates, alleging doctors failed to properly diagnose and treat his wife for cancer in 2018.
In a 17-page lawsuit filed in D.C. Superior Court Monday, Patrick Tate alleges medical providers were negligent and failed to properly diagnose his wife with a cancerous tumor near the thymus gland, which he said led to her death a year later. Doctors only found one of two existing tumors near Tate’s wife’s thymus in a CT scan in May 2018, and the delay to identify and treat both gave way to her death in June 2019, according to the complaint.
The complaint states the doctors’ negligence worsened her case of myasthenia gravis, or MG – an autoimmune disease that can cause muscle weakness and thymus cancer.
“The decedent was never afforded the care and treatment that, more likely than not, would have led to a complete remission of her MG symptoms and spared her years of untold medical complications, neurological injuries, bodily injuries, disabilities, disfigurement, embarrassment, mental anguish, fear and apprehension of impending death and her untimely death on June 17, 2019,” the complaint reads.
Tate is suing three current or former GW Hospital doctors – Priya Rastogi, Elizabeth Molony Allen and Keith Mortman – in addition to Medstar Health, MedStar Georgetown Medical Center and Robert Laureno, a professor of neurology at the Georgetown University School of Medicine.
Spokespersons for the University, the GW Hospital, the MFA and MedStar did not return a request for comment.
Tate’s attorneys, Jon Stefanuca and H. Briggs Bedigian, did not return a request for comment. Tate could not be reached for comment.
The complaint states that after the CT scan where doctors only detected one of two existing tumors in May 2018, Tate’s wife underwent surgery at the GW Hospital in July to remove a thymoma, or a thymus tumor. Doctors failed to locate the tumor that was present in the earlier CT scan until completing the surgery, according to the lawsuit.
The lawsuit states the aggravation of the tumor that doctors previously missed and the stress of the July surgery intensified Tate’ wife’s MG symptoms and delayed her next surgery for seven months.
“Because of the seven month delay due to the earlier missed diagnosis, the thymoma increased in size and made the second surgery more complicated and more difficult to achieve a successful outcome,” the lawsuit said.
The lawsuit states after Tate’s wife underwent another surgery in February 2019, she was hospitalized from March to May with worsening MG symptoms and bouts of pneumonia. The lawsuit states she collapsed due to cardiac arrest in June 2019 less than a week after she was discharged.
Tate’s wife died later that month due to respiratory failure and a complete loss of oxygen in the brain after she was transported to the MedStar Washington Hospital Center.”

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D.C. housing initiative targeted at E Street encampment
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 17, 2021
“A local governing body questioned District officials about a new homeless encampment initiative seeking to connect residents with housing opportunities during its monthly meeting Tuesday.
Members of the Foggy Bottom and West End Advisory Neighborhood Commission pressed District officials for more information about the program, which they estimate could house 25 to 50 percent of residents living in three of the District’s largest encampments, including the E Street encampment near campus. Commissioners also voted to distribute humanitarian grants to two local nonprofits and received an update from a University official about last week’s evacuation of Townhouse Row.
Here are some of the meeting’s highlights:
D.C. unveils encampment initiative
Wayne Turnage, the deputy mayor for health and human services, Jamal Weldon, the city’s encampment program manager, said the new program would pilot at three encampments across the District – those located at E Street, the NoMa underpasses and New Jersey and O Street Park. They said the program would work to provide housing for encampment residents through heightened outreach work and support care for behavioral health and substance use.
Officials will also minimize trash and biohazards at the encampments to maintain their “overall cleanliness,” according to informational sheet about the pilot. The sheet states that the initiative should indicate whether an encampment will lose some of its health and safety risks or undergo a rise in “service connection and stable housing.”
“This particular program has identified three of the largest encampment sites throughout D.C., as well as three sites that have unfortunately had the most vulnerable consumers and highest level of health and safety risk factors,” Weldon said.
They said the unhoused residents at the E Street encampment are not currently at risk of eviction because the District shares their property with the National Park Service, adding that discussions between the city and NPS are ongoing so officials can determine a path forward, which could entail eventual evictions. Turnage said encampment residents who accept help will receive “intensive” case management and assistance for the housing process with tasks like obtaining IDs and vital documents.
“This is not something that bumps anyone ahead on a list or knocks anyone else off of a list or whatever the case,” Turnage said. “This allows us to address this situation for our unhoused encamped residents directly.”
Students have rallied to defend residents of the E Street encampment and avert evictions for years.
GW official explains evacuation
Kevin Days, GW’s director of community relations, updated commissioners about the Townhouse Row evacuation  and said the University has not identified additional spaces on campus that need “extensive remediation.” Days said the University still expects the relocation of students to only last two to three weeks, but he declined to comment further about the buildings’ remediation, only offering to provide information to commissioners offline.
“There is a detailed scope of work that describes what that remediation is,” he said. “The end result is we want students to be able to return to their townhouses and feel safe and not have their health impacted in a negative way.”
More than 70 students and faculty said mold growth and water leaks have caused cold- and flu-like symptoms since the start of the fall semester. Days said the University is in contact with the appropriate D.C. agencies, like the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, about the cleaning process at Townhouse Row.
Commissioners distribute humanitarian grants
The ANC unanimously approved sending funds to  Serve Your City and Ward 2 Mutual Aid , two local nonprofit organizations that will each receive a portion of the $12,000 that the ANC  allocated  for grants earlier this year. Commissioners Yannik Omictin and Trupti Patel, who created the humanitarian grants special committee in March to assist local residents who were struggling financially because of the pandemic, said the committee selected those two charities because they had no overhead costs, and all money would go directly into the community.
The ANC granted $8,400 to Serve Your City, which provides opportunities to at-risk students in D.C., and $3,600 to Ward 2 Mutual Aid, which provides meals and assistance to families and unhoused individuals. Patel said the two organizations had thoughtful and thorough plans for their grant packages, giving them the edge over several other applicants for the grants.
“They were very thoughtful in how they were going to use the money and were very diligent in making sure how they would report the feedback to the humanitarian grants committee,” Patel said. “So it was an absolute pleasure to donate this money.”
University announces bicentennial block party
Days also announced that GW will host a block party to celebrate its bicentennial early next month. The event will take place on F Street between 21st and 22nd streets Saturday, Oct. 2, and officials will shut down F Street for about six hours that night.
Days did not say which activities or attractions will be available at the block party, but he invited commissioners and neighbors to attend. Online registration is required, he added.
“I hope you will register and come and help celebrate 200 years of GW being in the Washington area and hope that we can celebrate with our neighbors,” he said.”

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Petty to remain permanent Colonial Health Center head
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 17, 2021
“Officials will not search for a new executive director of the Colonial Health Center as Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students Cissy Petty takes permanent leadership of the center, Petty said in an email.
After the abrupt departure of Glenn Egelman, the CHC’s director in 2017, Petty  assumed the responsibilities of leading the CHC on a temporary basis as officials searched for a new permanent director. Petty now said she will continue to lead the center going forward, focusing on engaging with staff members and providing health services to students.
“As a hands-on leader who advocates for our students’ well-being, I will continue to lead the center,” Petty said in the email. “In this role, I’m able to learn about issues directly from the dedicated staff at the center, who continue to provide excellent comprehensive care to our students.”
Petty said she spent the 2018-19 academic year engaging in conversations with students and families to hear feedback about what experiences they wanted from a “comprehensive” health center. She said she also spoke with CHC staff about the services offered to students.
Petty said that during her time as temporary leader of the CHC, she hired Jessica Parrillo as the head of the Counseling and Psychological Services and created a new health care facility on the Mount Vernon Campus. She said she has also expanded the CHC’s operational hours on the weekends and increased options for telehealth and virtual counseling options during the pandemic.
Petty added that the CHC has an “excellent team” in place with Parrillo as director of CAPS and Isabel Goldenberg directing medical services.
“These two leaders continue to run the day-to-day operations of the center and have helped guide our students through the last 18 months of the pandemic,” Petty said.”

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GW hosts first-ever Women's Org Fair
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 17, 2021
“Almost 30 women-based organizations on campus got together on Saturday, Sept. 11 to host the first-ever Women’s Org Fair at GW. Each group gave a brief overview of what they do before talking directly to potential new members during a subsequent tabling section of the event.”
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SBA Senate backs improvement of federal loan forgiveness program
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 17, 2021
“The Student Bar Association Senate passed a resolution declaring its support for the continuation and improvement of the federal government’s student loan forgiveness program at a meeting Tuesday.
The senate issued a joint resolution to express its support for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, passed by Congress in 2007 to relieve all student debt for workers employed in public service for at least 10 years. The U.S. Department of Education had announced in July that it is requesting information to address public workers’ issues with the programs, and officials opened a portal for institutions and individuals to submit public comments to identify how to improve the program.
SBA President Jordan Michel said opening up the PSLF program for public comment should have been initiated long ago since the program has been failing since its onset.
“The program essentially says that after 10 years of working in a public service job, you will get your loans forgiven,” he said. “It doesn’t quite work that simply. It’s really 120 payments and if you defer payment or miss a payment or anything happens in between that, it either resets or pushes back your clock.”
Michel said this resolution resonates with him because he plans to go into public service, and the program could benefit GW students who go into the public sector.
About 98 percent of public service workers do not receive student loan forgiveness because student loan companies mismanage students’ loans, according to the legislation. A report published by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in June highlighted how loaners have misinformed borrowers on the program, resulting in the borrower taking missteps in repaying their loans.
Senators approved a resolution to thank all University staff members for continuing their work during the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure students could continue to receive a quality experience amid the virtual environment. The legislation states that staff provided “consistent” emotional support and guidance while the students remained online.
“Staff and employees are a core pillar of the GW Law School community thanks not only to the hard work they regularly perform but also because of the many genuine friendships that exist between law school staff and law school students,” the resolution states.
The senate also passed legislation to amend its bylaws to clarify the relationship between the SBA and student representatives to “external bodies” like GW Law faculty committees. The legislation also provides a standardized procedure for the conduct of all potential future committees to faculty or administrative bodies.
Tara Suter contributed reporting.”

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Faculty Senate calls for transparency on HVAC upgrades
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 13, 2021
“The Faculty Senate passed a resolution Friday urging officials to release more information about the status of HVAC upgrades that were made across campus buildings to block the spread of the coronavirus after they said administrators have spread “misinformation” about ongoing maintenance.
The resolution, which passed with one abstention and one vote in opposition, calls for the University to provide a list of campus buildings and their corresponding level of alignment with expert guidelines with the GW community. The resolution comes after officials released a statement in June indicating that updates to GW’s HVAC systems were complete – but senators said in the resolution that two senate committees were told otherwise in a confidential presentation with Scott Burnotes, the vice president of safety and facilities.
Eric Grynaviski, a faculty senator and member of the senate’s physical facilities committee, said officials should follow the precedent set by former University President Steven Knapp, who provided data to the senate outlining the condition of campus infrastructure during his own presidency. But he said this was at a time when HVAC upgrades were not a primary concern, prior to the pandemic.
“So when we’re asking for the comprehensive assessment, we’re just asking for things that are traditionally provided to the Faculty Senate,” he said. “As a matter of course, this is information that the Faculty Senate has the right to know because it is essential to the education, teaching and research mission of the University.”
Grynaviski said officials should disclose this information to the GW community to allow students, faculty and staff who are immunocompromised, have family members who are immunocompromised or are unvaccinated to decide what precautions to take.
“It’s important for individuals like myself who have unvaccinated kids at home and worry about bringing the virus home to them or people who have a spouse or family members when certain types of health conditions for the virus might be particularly dangerous to them,” he said.
Grynaviski also showed a photo at the meeting of an office in the American studies building with an air conditioning unit that had mold “dripping” down the wall.
“So there are visible signs that the University had not undertaken the study or done the work, especially the inspections of the air filters which they said they did,” he said.
Several students who were evacuated from Townhouse Row last Sunday visited the hospital with symptoms that appear related to mold exposure after officials detected “biological growth” in the buildings. Dozens of students have also found mold growing in nearly 10 residence halls across campus, with some also visiting the hospital for symptoms that appear to be related to mold exposure.
Phil Wirtz, a faculty senator and professor of decision sciences and psychology, said neither Chief Financial Officer Mark Diaz nor LeBlanc signed off on recent University announcements regarding updates to GW’s HVAC systems.
He said the apparent lack of oversight may have contributed to the “miscommunication.” He said an “additional pair of eyes” may have helped clarify officials’ statements.
“We still have found ourselves in buildings that aren’t up to speed,” Wirtz said. “There has been a serious miscommunication – and let’s just leave it at that – that has, in fact, questionably led to the hospitalization of some of the people for whom we are fundamentally responsible as our first responsibility.”
More than 70 GW community members have been met with mold growth and water leaks in campus buildings after returning to in-person activities this semester – including multiple professors in Building GG, which houses the psychology department. More than 10 psychology professors and graduate students in 2019 complained of sewage pipe bursts, mold and pests, demanding a new building.
Miriam Galston, a faculty senator and an associate professor of law, said at the meeting that Burnotes, the vice president of safety and facilities, told her that he wasn’t aware that Building GG was being used as a classroom.
Interim Provost Chris Bracey delivered an update about the University’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, saying students have reported “a few” complaints about faculty mask non-compliance, like not wearing masks properly over the nose and instructing without masks within six feet of students. He added students have reported feeling “uncomfortable” about faculty instructing without masks while walking around the classroom.
The University currently permits faculty to lecture without a mask in a classroom if they are more than six feet away from students. Bracey said officials have developed a “review, tracking and enforcement process” that allows for “escalation” of repeat offenders as a result of the complaints.
“I encourage you all to remind your colleagues to abide by the mask mandate when in class because the students are paying attention,” he said.
Bracey said Disability Support Services has contacted and provided select faculty with clear masks to wear for classes with students with hearing or communication difficulties. He added that voice amplifiers are available from GW Information Technology in Rome Hall for faculty who teach in large rooms and may need more assistance making their voice heard while wearing a mask.
He said officials also distributed masks to all schools and deans, who will then distribute them to all academic departments on campus.
Bracey said the Campus COVID Support Team, which is responsible for GW’s contact tracing, will provide faculty with an “informative” notification but won’t notify all students if someone in the class tested positive for the coronavirus.
He said CCST will only inform close contacts of exposure because the positive student may not have been in a classroom during relevant periods, not everyone in the class may have been in close proximity to the student and the student can identify those who would constitute “close contacts.” He said this process allows CCST to dedicate its resources to those who are most likely to have been exposed and in close contact.
“Not every person in every class will be contacted about a potential exposure, but every faculty member will be informed that someone in the class has tested positive,” he said.
Bracey also gave an update on the University’s enrollment, saying the freshmen class currently totals 2,585 students, “right on target” with officials’ estimates and a 30 percent increase from last year. He said although only 44 percent of freshmen submitted an SAT or ACT score due to the coronavirus pandemic that halted in-person exams, their academic profile remains “strong” and “consistent” with the past two classes.
Bracey said the University recorded 25,983 total students on the first day of classes with approximately 6,500 residential students living on campus this semester. He said first-year residential enrollment and retention rates increased this year, with the first-to-second-year retention rate improving from 88 percent to 91 percent.
“We saw a slight increase in the number of new first generation, low income and traditionally underrepresented students,” he said. “A number of schools grew their undergraduate and graduate enrollments slightly this year as compared to fall of 2020.””

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GW's new dining plan is a positive step
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 13, 2021
“It’s been a long time coming, but GW is finally getting dining halls again. Over the next few years, three all-you-can-eat dining halls will be constructed in District House and Thurston and Shenkman halls. GW’s current dining plan offers freedom of choice but is also pricey and fragmented, leaving many students unable to afford enough food or adhere to dietary restrictions. The University’s new dining plan on paper seems like a positive step that could give students the opportunity to eat healthy and affordable food sustainably – but GW should make sure it actually ends up being reasonably priced in practice.
The new plan should be an innovative and meaningful step toward making GW more sustainable in the long run. Chief Financial Officer Mark Diaz and Dean of Students Cissy Petty said in an email to the GW community last month that the dining halls will operate through a partnership with Chartwells Higher Education, a college dining hall company. In an interview with The Hatchet last month, Diaz said that the University chose Chartwells because they are also committed to abiding by the University’s policy to eliminate single-use plastics, which bodes well. Under the current plan, GW can’t mandate restaurants around campus to reduce single-use plastics or ask them to buy local ingredients because they belong to larger companies that do not necessarily have the same type of relationship that a University has to a company that provides dining halls.
The University should insist that the food will be sourced locally to reduce the environmental impact caused by the transportation necessary to import food from larger farms, encourage sustainable agriculture and benefit the local community by supporting farmers in the area. Buying ingredients from local grocers, streamlining food sources and enforcing policies like banning single-use plastics in dining halls are just some of ways that GW can reduce its carbon footprint through the new dining plan.
Dining halls also provide a sense of community, especially for incoming freshmen, who are entering the big and chaotic GW environment for the first time and trying to form friendships. The first couple semesters of college can be tumultuous, and dining halls can become a place where students get acquainted with their peers. As of now, with the exception of students living on the Mount Vernon Campus, who have easy access to Pelham Commons, students have to decide which restaurant to eat at for many of their meals. This is can be a lonely endeavor because each student is constantly going to different vendors. But the new plan will encourage students to eat their meals in one of the three dining halls, where they are likely to see the same peers continuously.  The dining halls can provide refuge for students with varying schedules because they will serve as a reliable source of food at any time of day.
Nicholas Anastacio | Graphics Editor
GW tends to be a fairly fragmented place socially, with students self-sorting into small groups or student organizations. There is very little school spirit binding everyone together, which can make it hard to feel camaraderie with other students. More opportunities for students to meet people outside their immediate social circles seems like a great way to foster more of a sense of community at the University.
As the GW community welcomes these long-awaited changes, the University must still ensure that the new dining plan ends up being affordable in practice. The problem of food insecurity at GW stems from the steep price of food in Foggy Bottom – an all-you-can-eat dining hall could alleviate that only if paying for it doesn’t break the bank. Officials said the cost of GWorld could see a “single-digit increase,” which is promising, but could still end up being hundreds of dollars. The dining plan mandated for Mount Vernon Campus residents, the so-called “Pelham Plan,” seems like the closest point of comparison among current dining options. That plan is a hybrid of regular GWorld dining dollars and meal swipes at Pelham Commons – which is similar to a traditional dining hall – and costs $5,200 per year. That’s a pretty solid chunk of money, which could hit lower-income students especially hard, and GW should clarify what price increases students may have to deal with.
Almost everyone at GW has either personally struggled to consistently afford good-quality food, or knows someone who has. Over the next few years, as dining halls are phased in, it looks like that could finally change. If GW makes sure the new system is actually affordable for students, University dining will become a community-building experience instead of a culinary free-for-all.
The editorial board consists of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s staff editorial was written by opinions editor Andrew Sugrue and contributing opinions editor Shreeya Aranake, based on discussions with culture editor Anna Boone, contributing sports editor Nuria Diaz, design editor Grace Miller, copy editor Jaden DiMauro and  assistant copy editor Karina Ochoa Berkley.*
*Ochoa Berkley advised GW Dining in a separate capacity as vice president for sustainability for the Student Association. ”

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Closing the Confucius Institute but not the RSC sets a double standard
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 13, 2021
“Following years of external pressure , fueled by the rising tide of neo-Cold War and anti-China rhetoric in the United States, administrators decided to close the University’s branch of the Confucius Institute. The Confucius Institute is a cultural institute, which operates branches at more than 500 schools worldwide  that promote Chinese language and cultural events. Since the establishment of the first Confucius Institute in the United States in 2004, the institution has been under scrutiny for its potential threat to academic freedom as a result of it being previously funded by the Chinese government. Not only have administrators failed to publicly provide evidence that GW’s Confucius Institute specifically transgressed academic freedom, but the timing of the closure, following legislation passed by the U.S. Senate in 2021 barring the Department of Defense from funding universities with Confucius Institutes, suggests it was done to protect University funding from the U.S. military.
On the other hand, the University has continually reaffirmed its support of the Regulatory Studies Center, a research center at GW that receives millions of dollars from the fossil fuel industry and is equally, if not more, guilty of transgressing academic freedom for its role in propagating climate denial that serves the interests of its funders. It is possible that administrators have reasons beyond the forfeiture of military funding to close the Confucius Institute. But, if this is the case, administrators must justify their continued support of the RSC as it appears to be transgressing academic freedom just as seriously as the Confucius Institute was accused of doing.
The way administrators are seemingly applying a double-standard treatment of these two University centers raises important questions about the transparency of administrative research funding decisions, the politicization of University research choices and the protection of academic freedom. If administrators hope to maintain any claim to objective governance or transparency, they must close the RSC for the center’s own subversion of academic freedom and provide the GW community with an evidence-based rationale for the Confucius Institute’s closure.
Increased criticism of Confucius Institutes from Senator Marco Rubio , R-Fla., Senator Marsha Blackburn , R-Tenn., and others, follows increasing tension in the global politics arena regarding the U.S.’s efforts to subvert China’s international political power. Reminiscent of witch-hunting in Salem, scholars have been criminalized for merely having affiliations with China as apparently unsubstantiated allegations of Chinese spying proliferate. Jennifer Hubbert, the author of an empirical study of Confucius Institutes published in 2020 by the University of Hawaii Press, helps us understand Confucius Institutes as a product of relationships between individuals and countries and as “spaces of engagement and exchange, where soft power is produced and challenged through the globalization of the Chinese language.”
As a result, Confucius Institutes, although certainly not exclusively Confucius Institutes, are settings for empirical observation through which research, informed by different relationships of political power, is produced and controlled for consumption – whether that be China producing politically favorable knowledge or the U.S. producing it. Instead of asking whether the Confucius Institute is ‘good’ or ‘bad,’ we should ask, in the context of globalization, how do we believe superpowers should conduct themselves with regard to their promotion and economic subsidization of University research projects?
While administrators have failed to comment on the reason for the closure of the Confucius Institute, the timeline closely follows that of other universities who have closed their Confucius Institutes following legislation introduced by Senator Ted Cruz, R-Texas in 2018, barring the Department of Defense from providing federal research funding to universities that host Confucius Institutes. A renewal of this legislation passed in 2021 blocks all federal education funding to universities deemed to not have “full operational control” over their Confucius Institutes.
According to a 2015 Vice News report , which ranks GW as the fourth “most militarized” school in the country, measured by ranking which schools have the “closest relationships with the national security state” and profits the most from American wars, GW could have a lot of defense money to be afraid of losing. Keeping the Confucius Institute open and having this funding restricted would also be especially detrimental to University administrators who advocate for austerity budget cuts and layoffs over choosing to tap into the University’s endowment to balance the budget. While the rationale for the closure is still unknown, GW’s decision to close the Confucius Institute, if it was done to protect military funding, would be a form of economically motivated knowledge production in its own right outside of the standards of academic inquiry.
Compared to the Confucius Institute, the case for abolishing the RSC is backed by similar – I believe more – compelling evidence. First, the RSC receives more outside funding than the Confucius Institute used to. Since 2013, the Confucius Institute has received $3.4 million from the Chinese government. Over that same period, the RSC has received a combined total of $5.1 million from Koch, ExxonMobil and Searle Freedom Trust – all three of these funders have been identified as among the most influential organizations in the climate change countermovement. In fact, all of the money Charles Koch gives to the RSC puts GW in the top ten of colleges accepting Koch money. This is especially troubling given Koch Industries’ role in  subverting academic freedom at college campuses across the country, including, demonstrably , at GW.
As long as the University continues to apply undisclosed standards of acceptable academic research funding, the University cannot claim that the Confucius Institute was closed due to concerns about academic freedom alone. It is time administrators lift their veil of non-disclosure and transparently provide the student body with their rationale for the closure of the Confucius Institute. And if the University purports to have a true interest in academic freedom, it needs to justify its support of the RSC. But if it can’t, then the University should close the RSC under the same precedent.
Karina Ochoa Berkley, a junior majoring in political science and philosophy, is an opinions columnist and the assistant copy editor.”

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Book recommendations from the Hatchet's staff
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 13, 2021
“Textbook readings, journals and news articles might be piling up on your to-do list, but don’t let that stop you from picking up a book to read for pleasure.
Studies have shown that reading without restrictions, expectations or assignments is a great way to calm mental anxiety and feel a sense of intellectual accomplishment. We asked our staff what their favorite book of the summer was and why other people should give it a read.
If you’re hoping to keep your summer reading streak going into the school year, check out these recommendations:
“Unaccustomed Earth” by Jhumpa Lahiri
Short story collection
Shreeya Aranake | Contributing Opinions Editor
This collection of short stories includes themes and storylines highlighting the experiences of Indian Americans. It explores the experiences of older Indians who immigrated to the United States and the feelings of their children who grew up here. This mixture of perspective parallels the mixed cultural environments of the characters in these short stories.
“I loved this short story collection, because it magnifies the heartbreaking realities of growing up and growing apart from the people you’re supposed to be the closest to. It’s also an incredible portrait of the tumultuous nature of first and second generation immigrant identities.”
“Writers and Lovers” by Lily King
Romance/coming-of-age
Grace Miller | Design Editor
A struggling writer in Boston, Casey Peabody, navigates her way through the unpredictability of life just after her mother’s death. She experiences passion and romance with old and new lovers, but nothing seems to work out all while contemplating the significance and purpose of her writing.
“‘Writers and Lovers’ is a beautiful portrait of grief and struggle written so honestly that it just seems like a snapshot of someone’s life. The writing is mature and the character arc you witness is both heart-wrenching and heartwarming. It’s brutally relatable and the captivating story arcs have you not wanting to put it down.”
“The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America” by Richard Rothstein
Historical nonfiction
Anna Boone | Culture Editor
Rothstein details actions taken by the local, state and federal government to further housing segregation well into the late 20th century. He also examines how the private sector played a role in pushing the Black community into economically shallow multi-family housing communities while white people enjoyed the benefits of single-family neighborhoods with accessible community resources.
“This non-fiction book about the history of housing segregation in this country is a vital read. It deconstructs naive assumptions about the state of predominantly Black communities that exist today and underscores the pervasive racism that existed in private and public sectors following the Civil Rights Movement.”
“The Unhoneymooners” by Christina Lauren
Contemporary romance/comedy
Grace Hromin | Senior Photo Editor
After a bride and groom get food poisoning at their wedding, a non-refundable honeymoon trip is taken by an unlikely pair. The brother of the groom and sister of the bride, who have hated each other for two and a half years, embark on a comedic and unexpected romantic trip together.
“The Unhoneymooners is a contemporary romantic comedy, basically an enemies-to-lovers trope with dramatic career and life choices mixed in. It was just an enjoyable summer read because it was cute and lighthearted while also easy to get through in one sitting.”
“The House in the Cerulean Sea” by T.J. Klune
Fantasy
Hannah Thacker | Managing Director
In a magical reality where children with supernatural characteristics exist, a government worker is given an assignment to assess an orphanage on the island of Marsyas. This orphanage is run by a secretive man who becomes a love interest for the unsuspecting main character.
“The House in the Cerulean Sea is a heartwarming book that blends fantasy elements with real-world problems and situations. Featuring a diverse cast of fantastic characters and a surprisingly relatable protagonist, this book left me with tears of joy.”
“Circe” by Madeline Miller
Historical fiction/fantasy
Clara Duhon | Contributing Culture Editor
Set during the Greek heroic age, this book incorporates adaptations of various Greek Myths. Told from the perspective of the witch Circe from the Odyssey, the novel details Circe’s origin story and follows her interactions with various figures in Greek mythology like Hermes and Odysseus.
“Circe is an ambitious intertwining of Greek myth set during the legendary Heroic Age. Miller’s rendition of Circe’s story is powerful, subversive and – despite its many predecessors – highly original.”
“The Five People You Meet in Heaven” by Mitch Albom
Philosophical fiction
Jaden DiMauro | Copy Editor
An 83-year-old amusement park ride mechanic dies unexpectedly on his birthday after a malfunction on a ride and finds himself in heaven. There he encounters five people who made significant impacts on his life when they were alive, whether he knew it or not.
“Mitch Albom’s ‘The Five People You Meet in Heaven’ is a syrupy-sweet story about life, death and love told through a heartwarming imagining of the afterlife. In a pandemic-altered world where the usually avoidable idea of death is painfully ever-present, “The Five People You Meet in Heaven” provides an oasis where the reader can take solace in Albom’s plain profundity and be reminded that ‘Life has to end. Love doesn’t.’”
“The Poppy War” by R.F. Kuang
High fantasy
Nuria Diaz | Contributing Sports Editor
Young Fang Runin, known as Rin, grows up poor as she was orphaned by the previous war. She focuses on studying to get into an elite military academy, where she develops a gift for Shamanism that allows her to call upon the vengeful Phoenix God.
“The book builds upon the character arcs to present the horrors of war and the bleakness of human nature. Overall, the book’s narrative pushes the reader out of their comfort zone to confront a reality many chose to ignore. The book holds a beautiful dark fantasy world that will keep you hooked until the end.”
“Golden Gulag” by Ruth Wilson Gilmore
Nonfiction
Karina Ochoa Berkley | Assistant Copy Editor
“Golden Gulag” gives an eye-opening analysis of the circumstances surrounding the unreal incarceration rate in U.S. prisons, with a 450 percent increase since 1980 alone. Gilmore focuses specifically on California prison systems and analyses the systematic forces at work in this crisis.
“Gilmore, a professor at the City University of New York graduate center, provides one of the first cumulative, critical analysis of the political economy of super incarceration in California. The book analyzes how the proliferation of mass incarceration in California is not only symptomatic of global and local political and economic forces, but that the political consensus that prisons are a solution to social ills is incorrect.””

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Officials to consult environmental experts amid mold reports
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 11, 2021
“Officials confirmed that the Division of Safety and Facilities observed high humidity and what appeared to be mold in two Townhouse Row units in an email to the University community Friday.
Vice President for Safety and Facilities Scott Burnotes, Assistant Vice President for University Resilience Kathleen Fox and Associate Vice President for Facilities, Planning and Construction Management Baxter Goodly said GW is consulting outside experts, like industrial hygienists and remediation specialists, to conduct a “deeper” investigation of the environmental concerns in Townhouse Row. Officials said facilities staff will inspect every residential building with “nationally accredited” mold assessors to confirm and address any other issues.
“We want to emphasize that the health and safety of our community is our top priority,” the email states.
Officials instructed 175 Townhouse Row residents to evacuate their units Sunday night, relocating them to the Yours Truly Hotel and the River Inn for at least two to three weeks, according to an email sent to residents. Residents received a three-hour block Tuesday to finish moving out, according to an email sent to residents Monday.
Multiple residents have sought  medical attention for respiratory issues, like coughing up blood and fevers, in the last week amid reports of mold exposure. Some residents said they were experiencing flu-like symptoms but tested negative for COVID-19.
Several residents who were originally moved to the River Inn on Sunday were relocated to Hotel Hive Tuesday. The move occurred after students alerted officials that some were sleeping on couches or futons in the River Inn’s rooms because there was no second bed, according to an email sent to Townhouse Row residents.
Officials said if students have immediate concerns about their residential space, they should submit a FixIt request to have facilities assess the space and remedy it if necessary.”

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Here's what to expect at this week's Faculty Senate meeting
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 10, 2021
“Faculty senators are set to discuss a report on shared governance and transparency behind the University’s updates on GW’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems this Friday in their first in-person meeting since March of 2020.
The meeting comes after a summer filled with administrative news – like the announcement that University President Thomas LeBlanc would be stepping down – and an evacuation of nearly 200 students from Townhouse Row one week into the fall semester because of building conditions that were conducive to “biological growth.”
Here’s what you can expect to hear about on Friday, based on the meeting’s agenda and what we know so far:
HVAC upgrades and transparency
A group of faculty senators introduced a resolution last week expressing concerns about the timeline for the University’s HVAC system upgrades – which officials said would be completed by the end of this week. Throughout the past year, officials have worked on HVAC renovations to align buildings with reopening guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, but senators said officials used “misinformation” in a statement earlier this summer outlining officials’ progress on the updates.
The statement issued in June indicated that officials completed HVAC upgrades, but officials issued a second update last month, stating that officials failed to provide enough context about the renovations, still a “work in progress.”
The senate’s proposed resolution calls for officials to release to the senate ​​all “reports, recommendations, and technical analyses” relevant to campus buildings’ alignment with CDC and ASHRAE guidelines, and it urges the University to provide a list of campus buildings with their corresponding level of alignment with official guidelines to the GW community.
The resolution also discourages officials from marking the reports as confidential in the interest of transparency, and it recommends they “comprehensively describe” all of their actions to align campus buildings with CDC and ASHRAE guidelines.
Shared governance report
The senate also included a “report on shared governance” as an agenda item, outlining instances in which shared governance between faculty and administrators at GW was successful and unsuccessful alongside suggestions on how to improve it.
Board of Trustees Chair Grace Speights sent an email to faculty in May, saying she had been “troubled” by some professors whose contributions have done more to “foment discord” than contribute to civil dialogue after LeBlanc  announced that he would step down at the end of this academic year. Speights said the Board would begin a review of the Faculty Code to assess “appropriate avenues” for input from the faculty given these concerns.
“Successful shared governance relies on constructive engagement – something I believe has been lacking over the past year,” she said in the email. “I am troubled by the actions of a faction of self-appointed faculty spokespersons whose contributions to this process more closely resemble a campaign to foment discord rather than civil dialogue.”
Presidential search
Officials have been  quiet  on their progress in the search process for a president to replace LeBlanc, but faculty have been working to develop a consultative committee of professors who will represent faculty input throughout the search. Members of the committee may be elected to serve on the Board’s presidential search committee.
Senators  voted  on a resolution at their August meeting to expand the consultative committee to increase diversity within the group in areas like rank, discipline, gender and race. They said the senate’s executive committee would try to finalize a list of professors that senators would propose to serve on the consultative committee by Aug. 27.
The senate has not released any public updates about the slate, which the Faculty Assembly will eventually approve at a special meeting.”

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SAEPi hopes to build community on campus
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 08, 2021
“After becoming the newest chapter to join  the Panhellenic Association last spring,  Sigma Alpha Epsilon Pi hopes to collaborate with other local chapters this upcoming year. 
Sorority members said SAEPi is seeking to build a community within the chapter through social and religious events as well as with SAEPi chapters from other universities and other on-campus sororities at GW. Sorority leaders said they hope the chapter provides a space for its about 25 members, along with prospective students, to connect with other Jewish women to ensure they don’t have to sacrifice their Jewish identity for a traditional Greek experience. 
Senior Rebecca Ionae, the president of SAEPi, said the chapter started as a small group in fall of 2018 before it was officially recognized by Panhel in the spring. She said she joined the chapter in spring 2019 after hearing about SAEPi through her friends at GW Hillel and decided to become involved within the organization in seeking to be a part of a Jewish community on campus.
“I joined SAEPi because I needed the Jewish community on campus that it provides,” Ionae said in an email. “It has always been a space where I feel at home, like I’m surrounded by family.” 
SAEPi was founded as a national Jewish sorority in 1998 at the University of California Davis, according to the national chapter’s website . Nationwide, SAEPi currently consists of 15 active chapters and colonies  – which are chapters awaiting formal recognition – the website states.
Junior Michelle Rechtman, the vice president of SAEPi, said members’ common experiences as part of the Jewish community bonds them as sisters. She said SAEPi also includes many members involved in other Jewish organizations on campus like GW Hillel, JStreet U – a student organization that advocates for a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict – and   GW  for Israel.  
“While we all have different experiences and upbringings and have experienced Judaism differently, we always have the bond of being Jewish,” Rechtman said in an email. 
Alumna Lila Gaber, a founding member and former president, said she and two other students started the chapter to create a Jewish sisterhood on campus after feeling that one was missing from their GW experience. She said the chapter’s planning phase began with meetings in students’ rooms and Shabbat dinners before growing into a larger community of members and leading to the creation of GW’s SAEPi chapter. 
“Over time we reached out to more people who were interested and grew an entire community,” she said in an email. “It’s been amazing to see it grow, and I can’t wait to see where it goes from here!” 
Senior Phebe Grosser, the secretary of SAEPi and a Hatchet photographer, said chapter leaders hope to connect with Towson University’s chapter  to host a Shabbat dinner program together soon. She said leaders hope potential members feel they have a safe space to learn about SAEPi’s core values like unity, trust, strength, sincere sisterhood and exemplifying Jewish values.  
“One thing that was exciting for me especially was seeing girls I did youth group/went to camp with and reconnecting with them,” she said in an email. 
Grosser said being in a smaller sorority with 15 active chapters, as opposed to other sororities like Kappa Delta with 142 active chapters, has allowed chapter leaders and members to develop a personal relationship with their national board. She said recruitment for the chapter resembles an informal process and will take place at the same time as other sororities on campus this coming spring.  
​​”This year will be a really great year,” she said. “Our members are engaged in so many different organizations both Jewish organizations and secular organizations.”
Sophomore Eliana Pierotti – the public relations chair and Sunshine girl, a welcome event coordinator –  said she works to plan social events to help members bond, like a birthday event to celebrate members who had birthdays over the summer. 
“​​ I wanted to be around women who cared about creating genuine friendships and learn about Judaism and Jewish culture with them,” she said in an email.
Pierotti said the chapter will plan COVID-19-safe bonding events this year like a “dip night” where members each bring different types of dips and get to know one another.
She said that she hopes SAEPi will be able to connect with other sororities on campus to widen the chapter’s community and build an on-campus presence. 
“Every time we interact with each other, it’s really important to keep us close and good friends,” Pierotti said.”

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Professor launches podcast on future of nursing
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 08, 2021
“A nursing professor launched a podcast about health disparities and burnout within the nursing profession in collaboration with the National Academy of Medicine last Tuesday.
Ashley Darcy-Mahoney, an associate professor of nursing who helped staff and produce the podcast titled “The Future of Nursing,” said the new show will contain eight 30-minute episodes featuring frontline nurses and experts in health equity from across the country. She said nurses will share stories about their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, their careers and the role they play in addressing inequities like the lack of access to health care that marginalized communities face.
“What we hope this podcast will help is that the achievement of health equity in the United States can and should be built on strengthening nursing capacity and expertise, including removing permanent barriers,” Darcy-Mahoney said.
Darcy-Mahoney said health disparities in the United States are “stark,” and uninsured people are  less likely to receive preventative care. She said nurses face many barriers like the scope of practice required to become a registered nurse and preventative licensure laws , like requirements for health practice to be supervised by another health provider or doctor.
Darcy-Mahoney said the episodes will release weekly on Spotify, Google Podcasts and Apple Podcasts.
She said the podcast is based on a report  published by the National Academy of Medicine called the “The Future of Nursing 2022-2030,” which addresses the role nurses play in increasing access to health care and diversifying the health workforce. Darcy-Mahoney said she spent the past year as the NAM’s nurse scholar in residence, editing, writing and helping produce the report.
The American Nurses Association, the American Academy of Nursing and the American Nurses Foundation, all support the NAM’s nurse scholar-in-residence program.
Darcy-Mahoney said Charmaine Lawson, a nationally recognized and award winning nurse practitioner, will co-host the podcast with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a philanthropic organization committed to improving health care in the United States.
She said she hopes the podcast will “bring the Future of Nursing report to life” and reach patients, community members, physicians and nurses.
Darcy-Mahoney said the first episode, which came out last week, features Felicia Bowen – the assistant dean of undergraduate programs at the Medical University of South Carolina and a retired army nurse – who discussed her experiences working with veterans. She said the upcoming episodes discuss removing barriers to health care, like high copayments, diversifying the nursing education workforce and recruiting students from different backgrounds.
“Nursing schools need to intentionally recruit, support and mentor faculty and students from diverse backgrounds to ensure that the next generation of nurses reflect the community that it serves,” Darcy-Mahoney said.
Experts in nursing said the podcast will shed light on the nursing profession for people who don’t follow statistical reports about nursing inequities.
Dalmacio Flores, an assistant professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania and an HIV and AIDS certified registered nurse, said nurses are vocal in their advocacy about their patients and themselves, and he doubts the podcast will shy away from any controversial topics.
“I think it will do justice by covering what needs to be covered and hopefully being honest and calling out the systems that need to do better so that our profession thrives and is able to allow nurses to do what it is that we’re good at,” Flores said.
Flores said it’s “beautiful” that the podcast features personal anecdotes, including one from a nurse practitioner’s experiences working in Macon County Alabama, one of the poorest counties in the state.
The podcast will also feature doctors like Susan Hasmiller, the senior adviser for nursing at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Michael McGinnis, a senior scholar at the NAM.
Sue Anne Bell, an assistant professor of nursing at the University of Michigan School of Nursing, said the lack of diversity in the nursing field served as another major issue that the podcast discussed in the first episode. She said diversifying the workforce beyond its current base of white women will help build a system in which nurses come from the communities they serve.
Hispanic and Black nurses made up just 10.2 and 7.8 percent of registered nurses this year, respectively, according to data compiled by Carson-Newman University.
Bell said nurses are also facing burnout after being overworked in unsafe hospital situations during the pandemic. She said she spent several months last year working in hospitals with coronavirus patients, which she recalls as a “scary time” to be a nurse.
Bell said Darcy-Mahoney is regarded as a “nurse leader” in the nursing community after serving as the NAM’s distinguished nurse of residence over the past year. She said she couldn’t imagine a “better time” for this podcast considering all the critical work that nurses have done in the pandemic.
“The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted some of the huge challenges that nurses face every day,” Bell said. “I look forward to the podcast kind of weaving what the future of nursing might look like with what nurses are experiencing today, and I’m very excited about it.””

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What the search for LeBlanc's replacement should look like
by The GW Hatchet
Sep 08, 2021
“We are at the beginning of the end of the LeBlanc era. The University president’s tenure has been a saga of antagonizing students, shunning faculty efforts at shared governance and unilaterally tilting GW toward STEM at the expense of the humanities. Now that he is retiring, the GW community is nearly-unanimously thinking some variation of let’s not do that again .
As the search for his replacement enters the early stages, it is important to lay out expectations of how the process should operate and what administrators should look for in a new president. In both the search process and in the final choice to replace LeBlanc, the values of transparency, diversity, shared governance and good-faith community outreach should be present at every step of the way.
Before going through what the GW community deserves in a new president, it is worth noting the process by which the new chief administrator will be picked. If it is similar to the search process officials used to pick LeBlanc to succeed retiring president Steven Knapp in the 2016-17 academic year, we should expect administrators to convene a search committee that will vet candidates, and a faculty consultative committee that will allow professors to weigh in.
The membership of the faculty consultative committee and the presidential search committee to pick the new president has not been finalized. This search process is three months behind the previous search process that resulted in LeBlanc’s hiring, but this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it can even be a good thing. It means administrators still have time to make the search committee representative of the GW community and its interests.
Faithfully representing the GW community means a number of things. Primarily, the yet-to-be-announced search committee should include a wide range of voices. There should be direct student representation in the room where decisions are being made. Whether it’s the SA President or a member of a prominent advocacy group on campus, the student body has to have a representative – one not just weighing in on the process or making critiques from the sidelines, but actually helping to make decisions.
The same holds true for faculty. The relationship between administrators and faculty has been fraught over the past five years, with many professors feeling as though their needs and input were ignored by LeBlanc’s team. Professors from every school should be heard at every stage of the search process, and should be a large presence on the search committee. We have actually seen some solid progress on this front – the Faculty Senate made the right call in expanding the faculty consultative committee to include members from all schools at GW. Not only will this help bolster representation of humanities departments – a must, considering how the last search process helped give us the 20/30 plan – but it will also help increase representation of diverse voices on the committee.
This leads into the third key area that the search committee must pay attention to: diversity. Especially considering incidents like LeBlanc’s use of a deeply racially insensitive analogy on video, the committee has an absolute obligation to make sure that racially, ethnically and religiously diverse voices are heard. This isn’t just about checking off boxes of who’s on the committee and who isn’t – it’s about making sure the communities who have been hurt the most before and stand the most to lose now have sufficient representation in the decision to wield veto power over any potentially problematic pick to replace LeBlanc.
Representation should also go beyond the simple matter of who’s in the room and who isn’t. It will be important that students, faculty and staff who are not intimately involved with the process still have an opportunity to weigh in. In fact, that is probably the most important element of running a process that is truly representative. The committee, throughout the entire time it is working to fill the presidential slot, should be listening to what everyday GW community members are saying. This could come in the form of town hall-style meetings like the ones held during the previous presidential search. Administrators don’t need to be conducting person-on-the-street interviews in line at Sol, but they should at least be fully aware of the mood and sentiments of those they represent. Feedback from the entire community should be heard, should be listened to in good faith and should factor into the final decision in a way people can clearly see.
Finally, the search process must be transparent. People should know the status of the search. This could be as simple as a series of semi-regular emails to the GW community. Administrators have had a mixed record in terms of communicating with the student body, but they have gotten better at it recently – through COVID-19 and campus reopening, students have received frequent emails from administrators about progress toward returning to in-person classes. The search committee should keep that energy and make sure they are communicating with regularity, even if there isn’t huge news. A student or professor who pays a decent amount of attention to what goes on at GW should be able to say off the top of their head what the most recent step the committee took was – whether it’s finalizing its membership, laying out what it wants to see in the next administrator or releasing a shortlist of picks for the job.
Students and faculty have had an adversarial relationship with administrators since before most current students even got here. If GW’s community and administrators are to get along, the first step is for the next leader of the University to be picked through a process that students, faculty and staff genuinely feel like they had a say in. If administrators are able to get the process right in all of these ways, then chances are, whomever they pick will be a good choice to lead the University.
The editorial board consists of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s staff editorial was written by opinions editor Andrew Sugrue and contributing opinions editor Shreeya Aranake, based on discussions with culture editor Anna Boone, contributing sports editor Nuria Diaz, design editor Grace Miller, copy editor Jaden DiMauro and assistant copy editor Karina Ochoa Berkley.”

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These are the things we do for love
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 30, 2021
“When I measure the distance from my apartment to his, it’s 66 miles. It’s an hour and five-minute drive for him, sometimes even more dependent on traffic. For me, it’s a bus ride to the Blake Transit Center, getting on the Michigan Flyer for an hour and a half, and then driving to his apartment. No matter the distance between the two of us, these are the things we do for love. 
I met my boyfriend online in December of freshman year. We met on Bumble (yes, a dating app). The beginning of our relationship was very exciting. I was at home in New York City and he was at home in East Lansing, so our “talking stage” was completely virtual, sharing memes and text messages. I remember texting him about my family, sharing our Christmas tradition of only eating pepper pot and bread on Christmas morning and him sharing his stepmother’s tradition of making Yorkshire pudding for Christmas Eve dinner. We would exchange pictures of our locations in time, me sending him pictures of art from the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan and him sharing pictures of his cat Kiwi curled up on the beige cat house at his dad’s house. I was attentive to his text messages, taking in every sentence telling me about his family, cats and friends each day because that was the only form of communication we had. After a month of only communicating virtually, I was squealing with joy at the thought of meeting him in person. By the time we met in person that January, I felt as if I already knew him for ages. Sadly, we would only see each other on weekends, because while I was a first-year student in Ann Arbor, he was a junior at Michigan State University in East Lansing. 
Saturday mornings during my freshman year were a race against time. Being in a (somewhat) long-distance relationship makes time spent together very sacred. Every second, minute and hour spent with him brought me peace at the end of my hectic school week. Therefore, I was always trying to find the fastest way back to my dorm from work in order to get on the earliest bus to see him. During my walks back to the dorm on Saturday mornings, I would carefully break down my entire afternoon, assigning a task to each minute to ensure I caught the bus on time. “Shower at 1:00, makeup at 2:00, hair at 2:30, be out the door by 3:30” repeated in my head like a broken record to make sure I never missed a beat. For me, time with him was precious, something I could not afford to lose. 
This race against time and me came to a finish when the pandemic hit. After dating for only three months, we took a leap of faith and decided to move in together. Before moving in, I was nervous because we only knew each other for such a short amount of time, but were about to take a huge step forward in our relationship. “Are you sure you want to do this?” I’d ask him at least once a week. “I mean, if this is going to work, it’s better to find out now instead of later,” he would tell me. 
Living together had its own challenges: who was cooking dinner, who was cleaning the bathroom and who was taking out the trash were always debatable questions. As time went on, I slowly caught myself frying my onion and garlic and making curry for us. Eventually, I turned the stove on every other night. On the weekends, the scent of fresh laundry detergent would intoxicate my nose when I started the washing machine. Slowly, but surely, I was fulfilling the stereotypical duties of a housewife. 
He began to embody the role of a man of the house, spending all day at work and returning home only to answer more phone calls and finish projects. I spent the day making the bed, cleaning the room, making each meal and running the dishwasher. When sharing the dynamics of our relationship, my friends would roll their eyes and say, “He needs to pitch in more, you can’t be the only one doing everything.” At first, I did not have a problem with the role I embodied, but hearing their words made me notice just how much I was contributing to household chores. Eventually, I felt resentment build up inside of me. 
I remember calling my mom one day and expressing my frustration, telling her he “leaves his things all over the apartment” and “takes advantage of the things I do for him.” As an Indo-Caribbean woman, I grew up watching my mother do these same “chores” for my father while he was at work. She would make him chai in the morning, clean the house and make him fried okra and roti for dinner. When I asked her if she ever got tired of doing this for my dad, she would always say no and tell me she understood how hard my dad worked during the day. She used to say something that I never really understood: “These are the things we do for love.” She was quick to remind me that my significant other was working 14 hours a day for us and that when we weren’t living together he was constantly calling me, reassuring me whenever I had doubts in school and driving to Ann Arbor to spend the little hours of free time he did have with me. She expressed that it is not about who does more laundry or dishes or who makes dinner in the relationship, but about how we spend time together at the end of the day. Her perspective shocked me because I always assumed that as a stay-at-home mom, she was tired of taking care of the house for my dad and us as children. However, she said she was always willing to do these things if it meant that she and my dad could sit together for dinner at the end of the day and simply have a conversation.
Looking back at this internal conflict I had with myself, I now understand what my mother was saying when she said, “These are the things we do for love.” It is not about who does more for the other person in relationships, but the things we do for one another that makes our days easier. Now that school is back in person, my partner and I have returned to short-lived weekends and homes 66 miles from one another. On Fridays after class, like freshman year, I find myself rushing home to take a shower at 1:00, finish my makeup by 2:00, and have my hair done by 2:30 to be out of the door at 3:30. During our time living together, I used to think I was contributing more to the relationship by taking care of the chores in our home. However, I think of the hour and five-minute drives he used to take to come see me, the 14-hour days he would work to support us and the sleep he would sacrifice. Somewhere in the midst of it all, I have learned that it’s not about how far you travel, but where you meet each other in the middle. 
MiC Columnist Anchal Malh can be reached at anchalm@umich.edu .
The post These are the things we do for love appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Sudhanshu Kaushik speaks to UMich Indian American Student Association
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 30, 2021
“In partnership with the North American Association of Indian Students , the Trotter Multicultural Center hosted an in-person event on Tuesday night with Indian activist Sudhanshu Kaushik as the guest speaker and about 100 people in attendance. The Indian video streaming service ZEE5 sponsored the event, which featured Bollywood music and film. 
Kaushik is the executive director of NAAIS, a nonprofit organization aiming to uplift the social and economic well-being of Indian international students and Indian Americans residing in the United States. 
Kaushik said NAAIS partnered with ZEE5 to tour college campuses across the United States and network with Indian students. He said networking with this group is important given that Indians make up the second largest minority group of international students on college campuses. 
“Our goal is to ensure that we can educate and raise awareness about young Indians across the United States,” Kaushik said. “The biggest thing is that there’s a channel for creating communication and sharing stories.”
Kaushik said he believes it is important to understand how every Indian student’s university experience is different, specifically highlighting the perspectives of Indian international students, Indian graduate students and Indian-American students. Kaushik also said there needs to be more awareness of the recent rise in hate crimes against Indians.
“The scale at which (Indians) are at (universities) makes them more accessible to becoming targets and victims of hate crimes,” Kaushik said. “Going beyond that, there’s just so much fragmentation, and there’s not a cohesive unit. We’re trying to create awareness of them and connect them with their city with their local regional governance, state and federal level.” 
Additionally, Kaushik discussed how COVID-19 restrictions on international travel were a stressor for many international Indian students, some of whom lost their homes on campus as a result. 
“What COVID did was it showcased that there’s a disconnect — a disconnect between Indian students, and a disconnect between them and the administration,” Kaushik said. “Whether it’s the university, or whether it’s the city, state, or our national level. This organization was started in 2020, but the history of Indian students in America is substantially old and significant.” 
Rackham student Shaunak Puri, one of the presidents of University of Michigan’s Indian American Student Association , said in an interview with The Michigan Daily he hopes people get more involved with the university and national community of South Asians. He said IASA aims to work on building those connections nationally. 
“I think something that I have learned over the last couple of weeks, is that we as IASA, are this connection point to a much broader network of Indian organizations across the country in the Michigan area,” Puri said. “I think that what I would want our members to gain is that sense of being part of something bigger that this (event) sort of opens the door to.” 
LSA senior Jhanvi Garg, IASA’s other president, echoed the hope for more IASA club members at the University to get more involved in issues that pertain to Indians in the United States. 
“I think that this was a great event to highlight the power that Indian voices have,” Garg said. “I think a lot of times we get shoehorned into the minority mindset of ‘we’re just Indian, we can’t really make that much of an impact.’ I think it’s a great message to our members — and the Indian youth nationally — that you really can get involved in politics and policy if you want to and they definitely should exercise their rights.”  
Business senior Delna Sholapurwalla, board member of IASA, said in an interview with The Daily IASA considered the shift between virtual and in-person during the pandemic to help create engaging events for IASA members. 
“Last year, everything was over Zoom, so we really did our best to get membership engaged and tried to put on some high quality events,” Sholapurwalla said. “This year, it’s a lot more (of) trying to get people pumped (to be) in-person … and we’ve definitely noticed high engagements.”  
LSA sophomore Nidhee Reddy, a member of IASA, said she joined IASA and attended this event to get more involved with the University’s community of Indian students.
“I’ve always wanted to keep the sense of (community) that I had back home, (so)  I think it’s really important to stay connected with your culture,” Reddy said.
During his speech, Kaushik said he believes that while the perspectives of Indian students are often underrepresented, their stories and experiences are still important and worth telling.
“We’re trying to organize and effectively (channel) this huge energy of potential that we have with Indian Americans towards creating a larger, more significant community for them, but history matters,” Kaushik said. “I want you to know that your history matters … it’s the fact that you represent something more significant, something more larger that isn’t talked about, that isn’t spoken about overall for the South Asian community, but specifically for the Indians as well.”
Daily Staff Reporter Nirali Patel can be reached at nirpat@umich.edu.
The post Sudhanshu Kaushik speaks to UMich Indian American Student Association appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Dingell announces legislation to hold colleges accountable for sexual misconduct
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 30, 2021
“U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., announced new legislation Tuesday that aims to hold universities accountable for pursuing investigations regarding allegations of sexual misconduct. 
The proposed Title IX Take Responsibility Act aims to increase schools’ accountability for sexual misconduct and prevent and correct the impacts of sexual assault at the university and state levels. The legislation comes after two universities in her district — the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University — came under fire for varying sexual assault and harassment cases. 
“For too long survivors of assault have suffered in silence, afraid to come forward for fear of retribution, attacks on their character, physical fear, or, quite frankly, lack of action,” Dingell said in a press release Tuesday. “Unfortunately, we see too much of it in Michigan, we see it across the country, and I’ve seen it in my own home.”
The act suggests that schools would be legally liable for failing to prevent or correct acts of sexual misconduct if the school is assumed to have had knowledge of the allegations. The bill would further enforce the “ reasonable care ” standard introduced by former Secretary of Education Betsy Devos. 
“This is trying to get universities, colleges, schools, to understand that when you’re hearing these rumors, they have (a) responsibility, even if no one’s filed charges, you’ve got to listen to these rumblings of a cultural problem on your campus,” Dingell told the Detroit Free Press in an interview. 
U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes, D-Conn., is a co-sponsor of the bill. In the press release, Hayes said the impact of sexual violence has a ripple effect for survivors, including issues of physical and mental health as well as academic difficulties.
“One incident of sexual violence is one too many, and those that enable and perpetuate violence must be held accountable,” Hayes said. “This bill would ensure that the onus is on education institutions to take responsibility for campus culture and sufficiently prevent and respond to violence against students, faculty and staff.”
The University is facing criticism in response to new information about sexual assault allegations against former football team doctor Robert Anderson. Hundreds of former University students have alleged Anderson sexually assaulted them over decades, stretching back to his first years as a University doctor in the 1960s. An independent report by the law firm WilmerHale found that top-ranking University officials knew of Anderson’s abuse as early as 1975 and allowed him to stay employed until 2003. 
Eastern Michigan University is also facing 24 lawsuits claiming the university failed to handle sexual misconduct allegations when students reported them. Earlier this month, four women and one man joined the other plaintiffs in requesting the University address the repeated instances of sexual assault both on and near campus. 
Daily Staff Reporter Shannon Stocking can be reached at sstockin@umich.edu .
The post Dingell announces legislation to hold colleges accountable for sexual misconduct appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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CSG debates Assembly’s impact in supporting Ann Arbor’s early leasing ordinances and changes to UMich sexual misconduct policies
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 30, 2021
“The University of Michigan Central Student Government convened Tuesday night to discuss the status of the Ann Arbor City Council legal battle regarding early leasing ordinances. The Assembly also passed a resolution endorsing a faculty motion on the University’s sexual misconduct policy for the Oct. 4 Senate Assembly meeting.
The meeting began with a resolution titled “Continued Support for the Early Leasing Ordinance,” which condemns landlords who have signed onto a recent lawsuit against the City of Ann Arbor and asks them to be removed from the off-campus housing website Beyond the Diag .  
City Council passed changes to the Early Leasing Ordinance earlier this summer, requiring landlords to wait at least 150 days instead of the previous 70 days before beginning to show properties to new prospective tenants. The Washtenaw Area Apartment Association, a non-profit organization representing rental property owners, filed a lawsuit against the city Sept. 10 in an attempt to overturn the changes.
CSG Vice President Carla Voigt, an Engineering junior, began discussion around the resolution by highlighting the previous work CSG did in collaboration with the Graduate Employees’ Organization and LSA Student Government in support of the changes to the Early Leasing Ordinance. 
“A group of Ann Arbor landlords and leasing companies have banded together to sue the city for this,” Voigt said. “And essentially this resolution is continuing our support and is talking about the lawsuit and says that these companies should be removed from the ‘Beyond the Diag’ website.”
Voigt said the resolution asks for the University to include the leasing company or landlord on Beyond the Diag and to add a rating service to the website. Additionally, the resolution requests that any leasing companies which signed onto the lawsuit against the city be removed from Beyond the Diag.
LSA senior Elena Swirczek said she was concerned removing the companies from Beyond the Diag could impair the clarity of the website. 
“While I appreciate the sentiment of (removing companies), I am worried that that could possibly just create less transparency and students won’t know what is going on,” Swirczek said. “Especially those that aren’t particularly well-versed in the internal politics of Ann Arbor.”
Voigt then reiterated that she wanted the Assembly to advocate for this resolution and addressed the safety concerns of students using companies which have been removed from the website. She said they plan to talk to the director of Beyond the Diag about implementing these changes. 
“I feel like (the rental companies) should not be supported by the University while they’re being predatory,” Voigt said. 
The resolution was referred back to the Communications and Resolutions Committees for further discussion on supporting advocacy in diminishing housing inequity in Ann Arbor.  
At the meeting, the Assembly also approved a resolution to support a motion on making changes to the University’s sexual misconduct policy being brought forth by faculty during a Senate Assembly meeting this upcoming Monday.
The motion asks the University to adopt recommendations from the investigation into former provost Martin Philbert, who was removed from his role after multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. 
When a search committee of a faculty or staff member is required, the recommendations ask the University to obtain written certification from committee members saying that all known information about the case has been disclosed and to document decisions on disciplinary action. The recommendations also ask the Equity, Civil Rights and Title IX Office to reference any reports on prior allegations while investigating allegations against an individual. 
The motion also requests that the University form a committee made up of sexual misconduct survivors by Philbert as well as Robert Anderson , a former athletic doctor who has been alleged to have sexually abused hundreds between the 1960s and early 2000s; Walter Lasecki , who resigned in August due to sexual misconduct allegations; and Bruce Conforth , who also had several sexual misconduct allegations arise against him. This committee would create an additional set of policies to present to the Board of Regents.
LSA sophomore Karthik Pasupula, who is sponsoring the resolution, said a student approached him about bringing this resolution to the Assembly.
“(The student was) pursuing a faculty motion to propose recommendations to the changes and sexual misconduct policies that the University recently made,” Pasupula said. “(This is) because (the University wasn’t) centering on the right priorities, and they weren’t operating in the proper way.”
Pasupula said though he feels CSG should endorse the motion, they should not be the main organization advocating for the changes. 
“I just don’t want CSG to be the main driver behind it,” Pasupula said. “We should be in a stance where we’re supporting it, not where we are the main pushers.”
On this issue, Swirczek said she felt it was CSG’s responsibility to both endorse and encourage the resolution.  
“To me, (passing this resolution) seems like we’re making it clear to people in the administration that we are endorsing (the motion) and it is something that we care about,” Swirczek said.
Despite conflicting opinions, the Assembly passed this resolution. Daily Staff Reporter Brooke Halak can be reached at bhalak@umich.edu .
The post CSG debates Assembly’s impact in supporting Ann Arbor’s early leasing ordinances and changes to UMich sexual misconduct policies appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Gen Z-Side
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 29, 2021
“We grew up on the Internet. We can recite pieces of pop culture with the accuracy of an encyclopedia. We hum TikTok sounds in our sleep, puncture our plastic cups with reusable straws and rant about our anxiety while sipping on iced lattes. We take life as one big, matcha-infused, Insta-filtered, sustainably-purchased cosmic joke. We are Gen Z.
For the Gen Z-Side, Daily Arts brings the zeal to Generation Z — we examine that word, its implications and its manifestations across all sorts of artistic contexts … movies, film, music, books, social media, culture and so it goes.
— Grace Tucker, Campus Culture Senior Arts Editor
Click on each post to read the story!
‘’’&“” ‘’’&“’”’“”—&’&&
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NAACP senior director Jacqueline Patterson speaks at Ford School of Public Policy about environmental, racial injustice
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 29, 2021
“The University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy invited Jacqueline Patterson, senior director of the NAACP Environmental Climate Justice program, to discuss climate and environmental justice in the wake of the climate crisis . Kyle Whyte, professor of environment and sustainability, moderated the virtual discussion.
Patterson began by discussing the Chisholm Legacy Project , an organization that provides resources for Black environmental and climate advocates named after Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman in Congress. Patterson is the founder and executive director of the CLP and said she built the project on the foundation of four beliefs: community building, movement building, education and supporting Black women in advocacy positions. 
Patterson then spoke about Chisholm, saying she admired her for her determination and  advocacy in the face of discrimination.
“I’m sure there were times when (discrimination) dampened her spirits, but when you see her in pictures she’s (always) smiling,” Patterson said. “It’s not the kind of smile that you see on some people, where it’s just  almost a gritted-teeth smile. It’s a genuine smile, but she still was able to find joy and humor in spite of the opposition that she faced.”
Patterson also said the CLP aims to bridge efforts to fight against climate injustice and racial injustice, making each movement aware of the other and allowing them to fight together. Patterson said how society views  our planet is tied to how we treat one another.
“We’ve seen how environmental injustice happens with the extraction and the exploitation of the communities that are host to these extractive processes,” Patterson said.
Patterson then spoke about the costs of climate change and asked attendees to contemplate which communities are contributing the most in terms of carbon emissions. Patterson said while certain companies are creating solutions to combat climate change, some of these solutions still exclude vulnerable communities.
For example, Patterson said she knew of a prominent solar company who shifted to using reusable energy, but used prison labor to do so. Even worse, Patterson said, the company will not hire formerly incarcerated individuals, though Patterson did not specify which company she was speaking about.
Something similar occurred in 2015 with the Georgia-based solar company Suniva Inc., which used prison labor to create solar panels at a lower cost. The Daily could not confirm whether Patterson was referring to Suniva Inc. specifically. 
“(When you talk about) extraction and exploitation, the prison industrial complex cornered the market on that (value),” Patterson said. “When we challenged (the company), they said if we support this then the prisoners have a skill that they can use when they get out. We’re like ‘okay, that sounds semi-reasonable, at least in terms of intent,’ until we learned that they have a policy against hiring formerly incarcerated persons at their company.” 
While there were environmental benefits to the program, the incarcerated community is the one paying the cost, Patterson said.
In her analysis of environmental racism, Patterson compared the problems seen in environmental and racial injustice to systematic inequalities exposed during the COVID-19 pandemic.
“The climate is the same pattern of systemic inequities that led to the same pattern of disproportionate impact and system collapse,” Patterson said.
When asked about how students pursuing environmental and social justice fields should approach the industry, Patterson said schools should reframe how these issues are taught.
“If we recontextualize environmental studies in a way that actually is rooted in what’s happening in our communities, (then) we have a whole new kind of way that youth are thinking about it,” Patterson said.
Whyte, the moderator, ended the discussion by saying that Patterson’s talk is inspiring for students interested in studying environmental and racial justice.
“If I would have only heard what you just said when I was a student, I would have been powerful to solve the different roles and possibilities for people to apply themselves and to take leadership,” Whyte said.
Daily Staff Reporter Shannon Stocking can be reached at sstockin@umich.edu.
The post NAACP senior director Jacqueline Patterson speaks at Ford School of Public Policy about environmental, racial injustice appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Dr. Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve discusses racial stigma in American courts at Ford School event
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 28, 2021
“Dr. Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Brown University and an affiliated faculty with the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, spoke on how race has shaped criminal justice policy Tuesday at a Racial Foundations of Public Policy event hosted by the Ford School of Public Policy. Dr. Celeste Watkins-Hayes, the director of the Center for Racial Justice at the Public Policy School, hosted the event.
Gonzalez Van Cleve’s book, titled “Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court,” won The American Sociological Association’s Distinguished Book Prize, which is the highest book honor in her discipline. Her research focuses on how race affects the experiences of participants in the criminal justice system. 
When asked by Watkins-Hayes why a sociological approach is important to understanding criminal justice policy, Gonzalez Van Cleve said sociology gives insights into the patterns of criminal justice abuse. 
“We saw the George Floyd murder , and in some cases, policymakers talk about this as a one-off phenomenon, that this is a bad apple trope,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “Institutions and cultures are bigger than one individual. If we see them as one individual, we see a tragedy that has happened as an outlier rather than a part of a pattern that in some ways indicates how policing occurs not just in one jurisdiction, but in multiple jurisdictions.”
Gonzalez Van Cleve said the criminal justice system should not be the first respondent to many issues, including addiction and mental health. She said many other institutions can help individuals suffering from those problems instead of prosecuting them right away. 
“When they hear the word criminal justice, they should start thinking, ‘What other institutions could have solved this, what other policies somewhere else could have solved this?’” Gonzalez Van Cleve said.
Gonzalez Van Cleve said she is a “dramaturgical sociologist” who thinks about the performative aspect of social life. She described border patrol officers “as putting on a performance” when they interact with immigrants.
“It is possible that immigration laws say that we need to round up people that are undocumented, and if they are not citizens they needed to be deported to their home countries,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “There’s probably a more neutral way that it is stated in the law. It does not say to rope people like they are cattle, and yet, those officers have images and cultural scripts about how to do this and to what type of people … I call those performances racial degradation, which is the signal to us that these people are different from us.”
Discussing what students should focus on when they want to help marginalized individuals, Gonzalez Van Cleve recommended a change in mentality by focusing on those in power and how they came to implement the harm they do today.
“Nobody wakes up and says, ‘I’m going to do harm today,’” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “They want to serve justice, they want to serve their country, they want to protect people. The million-dollar question is how did they become co-opted to do that action and create such harm.” 
Watkins-Hayes brought up the importance of looking back in history and relating past events with the imagery we see in the media today. 
“I think the examples we’ve recently seen at the border of agents trying to round up Haitian migrants on horseback, and the images being very disturbing, and what that invokes for people with the links to slave patrol of the previous centuries,” Watkins-Hayes said. “That kind of criminalizing and way of surveillance and capturing people has a certain historical valence for people that in the present day add a whole nother level of significance for people when they see it on their tv screens.”
Relating her earlier years to her book “Crook County,” Gonzalez Van Cleve shared that when she was a student observing other prosecutors, she noticed the blatant use of racial slurs and derogatory language towards Black people. She then conducted a study that involved sending law students to courts to observe prosecutors, and observed that white students are often given better treatment than Black students. 
“How did this become rationalized?” Gonzalez Van Cleve said. “At the heart of the answer is that you have a segregation between who gets to determine justice and who gets to be held accountable to justice. You have mostly upper-class white people making decisions about the morality of people of color.”
Gonzalez Van Cleve also added that prosecutors often used racial tropes to make case processing more efficient. One of the major racial tropes is the mope trope, which is used in drug cases to describe the defendant as lazy and under-motivated, and therefore not competent enough to be a criminal. 
Another racial trope Gonzalez Van Cleve described is the monster trope, which is used in violent crimes where Black men are described as predatory monsters to white women. These tropes are seen as helping to justify the defendant’s actions, but in reality, they are humiliating and detrimental to how Black people are treated in the court, according to Gonzalez Van Cleve.
“Those two tropes became easy handles to justify not just processing cases quickly, but also to justify denying people rights and to abuse the general public,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said.
Relating racial stigma to other social issues, Gonzalez Van Cleve said race is embedded in the media and policy-making through the idea of deserving and undeserving.
“When we start to talk about deserving and undeserving, that’s the signal that you need to start thinking about the racial stigma being associated with those labels,” Gonzalez Van Cleve said.
Daily Staff Reporter Caroline Wang can be reached at wangca@umich.edu .
The post Dr. Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve discusses racial stigma in American courts at Ford School event appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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SportsMonday: Don’t bury Michigan just yet
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 28, 2021
“After senior kicker Jake Moody missed a 47-yard attempt to put the game on ice, Michigan’s defense took the field. Again. 
With the Wolverine offense struggling to make an impact, Rutgers’s time of possession skyrocketed in the second half, totalling 17:42 of 30 total minutes. Now, with a chance to drive down and tie, or win, the game, the Scarlet Knights could take their momentum and drive past a weary defense.
Instead, junior linebacker David Ojabo executed a spin move and stripped Noah Vedral, the ball ricocheting into freshman linebacker Junior Colson’s arms. A worn down defense found a stop. Michigan would win. 
“(It was a) gritty game,” Harbaugh said after the game. “It wasn’t pretty. But when they make a space for pretty on the scoreboard, then we’ll worry about that.”
There are a lot of lessons to take from a game where the Wolverines beat Rutgers by one score and totaled just 47 yards of offense in the second half, drawing out fans and their shovels . But Michigan still won. It executed when it had to, sucking down time with an eight play, 33 yard drive (the only non-three-and-out of the half) and coming up with that crucial turnover. 
Not every team can do that. Look at Iowa State, or Clemson or Wisconsin. None of those teams executed when the time called for it.
“I think we had a positive attitude throughout the whole game, through all the ups and downs,” junior defensive tackle Christopher Hinton said. “ I really like that about the defense and this team this year. We’ve just got to keep that rolling because every game is not going to be sunshine and rainbows. We’ve just got to stay stout in tough times.”
Good teams win games, and this weekend the Wolverines won.
At least, they’re probably good enough to match pre-season expectations, maybe more. A 20-13 win over Rutgers may not be too flashy, but it shows that even with poor performances, Michigan can put together a win. And that’s promising. 
Consider the 2015 Michigan State team, which scraped by every game it won and did so in an incredibly frustrating fashion. But that team made the College Football Playoff while looking not impressive in any way. 
Or consider the Cornhuskers, who’s found increasingly funny ways to lose this year, always close but never finding the final push. Or Iowa State faltering and floundering to match the mountains of expectation heaped on them. Winning is a skill and a very difficult one to master. But once you figure out how to do it, it can carry you through rough patches like Saturday. 
Next weekend, we’ll see if this Michigan team has really learned how to win. It’ll face a Badgers team that failed to execute against Notre Dame and is now having the question asked of whether they can beat good teams.
“As a team, we’re not doing enough to give ourselves a chance to win and to beat good football teams,” Wisconsin coach Paul Chryst said after losing to Notre Dame. “That’s something that we’ve obviously got to improve upon, and everyone’s got to find a way to move forward.”
Wisconsin will pose a huge challenge, regardless of how it’s performed so far. It’s a program that’s used to winning and knows how to do it, unlike Rutgers.
The Badgers will target the weaknesses the Wolverines showed Saturday, but Michigan has shown an ability to create explosive plays through both the air and the run. In the first half, junior quarterback Cade McNamara showed what fans had wanted to see — he aired it out and found holes, doing what the fanbase desperately hoped he could.
And the defense, who, despite being repeatedly forced into difficult situations, stopped the Scarlet Knights when it mattered most. A fourth down stop, a missed field goal and a fumble are no small tasks. 
Fans shouldn’t be too scared, with shovels in hand to bury their hopes again. In the team’s first big battle of the season it showed an ability to work through the pain, something that was foreign last year. Disappointment will, for now, wait a little longer: maybe just one week, maybe until the Wolverines go to East Lansing. 
The post SportsMonday: Don’t bury Michigan just yet appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Poetry, storytelling and identity: Ross School of Business kicks off “Coming Out Week”
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 27, 2021
“Monday night marked the kickoff of this year’s Ross School of Business Coming Out Week , a weeklong series at the Business School centered around LGBTQ+ history and overcoming adversity. This year’s theme was “We Find a Way,” inspired by a scene in Hulu’s limited series “Little Fires Everywhere.” The series is based on the book with the same title written by Celeste Ng, a University of Michigan alum. 
The event was sponsored by Ozone House , a local youth shelter that works with young people in crisis and strives to prevent suicide in LGTBQ+ teens who are rejected by their families after they come out, according to Scott Ellis, an Ozone House representative. Plucky Comics, a company created by Ross MBA students that aims to educate people about Black queer history through comics, also sponsored the event.
The event featured Carlos Andrés Gómez, a Colombian-American poet, actor, author and equity and inclusion strategist. Andrés Gómez is the author of several award-winning books and has starred in numerous series and motion pictures including HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, TV One’s Verses & Flow and Inside Man with Denzel Washington, Spike Lee’s No. 1 box office movie.
“It’s weird and wonderful to be in a room with people again,” Andrés Gómez said at the beginning of the event. “I adore Michigan, I feel embraced even when I’m around random people.” 
Andrés Gómez spoke about his upbringing in New York City in what he described as a “hyper machismo culture.” He told the audience the only person that understood him and made him feel safe growing up was his grandmother. 
“I spent probably my first 13 years alive feeling like I didn’t belong anywhere and I think that’s why I feel a tremendous amount of empathy,” Andrés Gómez said. “I notice when people are not sitting at a table or tucked in a corner. I want to live in a world where we can feel like we belong in the bodies we live in as our genders, as our sexuality or whatever cultural or ethnic or racial identity we are.”
Thomas Krouse, vice president of event planning for Out For Business , the official LGBTQ+ group at the Business School, helped organize Monday’s event. Krouse told The Daily Andrés Gómez was highly recommended by other universities. 
“I read his program description and that he speaks about intersectional identities but also the ways that we bring our privilege into rooms, and the way that our privilege can shape a better world,” Krouse said. 
Andrés Gómez polled the audience about their experiences with microaggressions, emphasizing his belief that it is not anyone’s responsibility to educate others about issues related to identity.
“My greatest desire for an event like this is to build a world where all people can feel a sense of belonging,” Andrés Gómez said. “I mean if people leave here and think about the world, their identities and other people’s identities in more complex and humane ways, we’ll live in a safer world.”
Andrés Gómez also addressed issues relating to hyper-masculinity. Jackson Pilutti, a first-year graduate student at the Business School, found Andrés Gómez’s stories about masculinity to be particularly important and meaningful.
“Intersectionality is such an interesting conversation and is something that I like to talk about with friends, so I feel like I would love to hear more about the stories behind the poems and more about everyone’s experiences,” Pilutti said. “It was really powerful to hear people share their stories and relate to one another.”
Andrés Gómez described himself as a “deeply flawed work in progress” during the event and discussed his own battle with self image.
“Every ‘ism’ — everything that I’m trying to dismantle in my work, I’m trying to dismantle in myself,” Andrés Gómez said. “Being socialized and living in the world, it’s impossible to not internalize all these cultural and societal messages that have been reinforced for thousands of years.”
Krouse said he was thankful for and humbled by the students who took time out of their schedules to come and participate in the event. 
“I’d say that I’m grateful for Carlos for being vulnerable with us and sharing some of his identities with us,” Krouse said. “And I would hope that students have formulated some action steps on how to move forward on their own, diversity, equity and inclusion journey.”
Andrés Gómez ended the event by reiterating the importance of businesses driving social change.
“I’ve done this kind of work in the corporate realm, with Fortune 50 and 500 companies and major brands,” Andrés Gómez said. “I think most people in leadership positions in business recognize that living in a world that is more equitable and inclusive isn’t just the right thing to do, it actually makes businesses operate better. It helps you ultimately make more money, and live in a safer, healthier world.”
Daily Staff Reporter Jared Dougall can be reached at jdougall@umich.edu.
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Take COVID-19 classroom notifications into your own hands
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 27, 2021
“Was it the person sitting 100 seats away from me in my musicology lecture? Or maybe the person coughing next to me in my 15-person section in the basement of North Quad Residence Hall? If only there was some way to know!
Until very recently , the University of Michigan sent notification telling students they shared a class with someone who had tested positive for COVID-19. Admittedly, we weren’t told what room, when we were in that room or what class the exposure occurred in — but, it was better than nothing. Given that the University opted to stop providing any notice of potential contact in the classroom, students need to rise to the occasion to take care of each other — we are our best asset in protecting each other and our community.
As living with COVID-19 has become a longer-term reality , assessing risk and weighing exposure has become an important part of day-to-day life. Now that the University has ceased to provide any information regarding potential exposure in the classroom, making smart and safe health decisions is even more difficult. While I previously knew to avoid seeing a severely immunocompromised friend because I may have been exposed to COVID-19, now it is much more difficult to make pandemic-conscious decisions.
As we clearly can’t rely on the University to provide us with information regarding our exposure on campus, I propose that students take this issue into our own hands — we should be forthcoming with our professors and peers when we have COVID-19.  It could be anything as simple as, “Hey Professor X, I wanted to let you know that I tested positive for COVID-19 and will not be attending class this week,” to as specific as, “Hey Professor X, I sit in the fourth seat of row three, next to (insert people) and have been symptomatic; please let the class know.” Either of these messages (or anything in between) could be incredibly instrumental in keeping a classroom safe.
But why should the responsibility to inform fall on us? The University’s attempts at community care have been half-assed, to put it lightly. Policies like mandatory testing were replaced with optional testing and mandatory ResponsiBLUE checks to enter buildings were replaced with… nothing. The University shirked its responsibility for student health and safety and left a void of coherent policy and information that needs to be filled. 
Informing a professor that you attended class while unknowingly infected with COVID-19 could help them decide to hold the next meeting on Zoom to mitigate the risk of further infection. Letting the class know you tested positive could help stop those near you from endangering a friend or family member. This simple action could greatly benefit the community’s risk assessment and subsequent decision-making. Consider having a conversation with students in your class, your graduate student instructor or a professor about finding ways to keep the class informed for each other’s sake.
Now, there is always the position that the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA privacy laws, protect Americans from having to share this information. Vaccination status or COVID-19 positivity are both argued to be protected information that people can’t be forced to share against their will. While the legitimate argument surrounding health privacy rights is far more complex than many contributors to the national conversation around COVID-19 privacy understand it to be, this is a situation where health information would be fully volunteered. Simply put, no one would be forcing you to volunteer your COVID-19 test results to your classmates; it would be truly up to you to do the right thing. 
That being said, with little to nothing to lose by keeping your class informed about your COVID-19 positivity and a lot to be gained by helping those around you to make fully informed decisions, there really is no reason not to do it. If you test positive, take this small step to help out the community. Let those you interact with either inside or outside of the classroom know, and take your recovery seriously. The more we work together as a community, the easier it will be to live with this pandemic.
Andrew Gerace is an Opinion Columnist and can be reached at agerace@umich.edu.
The post Take COVID-19 classroom notifications into your own hands appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Importance
1
Messy on Main: The life and death of finsta
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 26, 2021
“The pains of sharing a photo on Instagram are almost never ending. A pimple too big, a filter too “cheugy” and a smile too large can all be deemed a final flaw. Even after finding the right photo, there is still the aesthetic to consider — pulling and twisting a photo you love to fit into the dollhouse that is your profile page. This pre-post step is mandatory: You have to clean up the clutter in an image, so it can perfectly occupy an ornate frame like an open house nightmare.
To be honest, this elaborate process is all too much for me. I haven’t posted on Instagram in, like, a year. Or, well, I haven’t posted on my “main” account that is. During the summer, I cultivated my “fake Instagram,” a.k.a finsta, as a chaotic conglomeration of bad poetry and midnight escapades to all 10 of my followers. This smaller, private account allowed me to vent about my feelings and post about private life in a way that my main account could never allow. Why in the world would I want my aunt — one of my many main-Instagram followers — to know when I’m clubbing, cruising and crashing?
Unlike Facebook, there is a level of anonymity that is fostered on Instagram. You’re allowed to have multiple accounts under the same contact information. In fact, these accounts aren’t considered connected to each other, giving the Gen Z user the freedom to make as many niche, obscure accounts as their heart desires. And the birth of finsta was inevitable after Instagram became mainstream . When you have hundreds of followers, finding a post that makes everyone happy is overwhelming. What might be funny to your college friends is “blasphemy” in the eyes of your uncle.
As opposed to these anonymous, niche accounts, the level of reality depicted on main Instagram accounts is abysmal. There is a saturated market for face editing apps . There are websites that will create special instagram caption fonts for your next post. On some apps, you even have the ability to track how and when your followers frequent your account.
But running a personal Instagram shouldn’t feel like being a marketing manager. Consolidating photos that are cohesive to your account’s “aesthetic” can look super cute, but is it true to oneself? To get those photos means leaving parts yourself out of the picture. Setting up photos at brunch feels a little artificial if you wouldn’t be caught awake before 1 p.m. on a weekend.
Social media shouldn’t feel limiting. Posting on your main page shouldn’t feel like adding set pieces to a retail display. It should feel like sharing what you love with people who care.
Sure, I have that sense of authentic closeness among my 10 finsta followers, but at what cost? Why lead this Hannah Montana fantasy — with girl-next-door Miley on a finsta and popstar Hannah on the main — when it is easier to just cultivate an authentic digital persona on one main account? Crusty dog photos, crying selfies and all? 
Gen Z has taken note of these questions, and Instagram culture has shifted. People don’t use their finstas as much, maybe because the pandemic showed just how tiring performing on social media can be in the end. Now, mains are messier —  in a good way.
It starts out small. A post of a sunset is met with a Vine (a.k.a. an extinct TikTok predecessor) quote. Suddenly, Twitter screenshots are used to punctuate the ends of slideshow posts. You repost content from @umichaffirmations more often. Insta stories are now home to Spotify recommendations and blurry candid photos. 
I appreciate the candidness of the people I follow. Their mains are messy in a way that a room is lived in. Sometimes you don’t make your bed, and that is okay. Sometimes you have pit stains when taking a selfie, and that is also okay. Your pit sweat shouldn’t kill your happiness just like the assortment of cups that adorn your room isn’t clutter, but chic. I mean, my room right now is college-core, raccoon-eye chic; interior design is not my main concern.
The spaces we exist in shouldn’t be ready-made store displays. Instagram shouldn’t feel like the dorm room shown to you during a campus tour. Social media is not the room where all your dirty clothes, mismatched socks and retainers are thrown in the closet. That is so 2015. 
Let the chachkas you love and collect bathe in the sun. For so long, I thought social media was a thing to be graded or gawked at. But it can be something to explore and grow into when you get messy on main.
Daily Arts Writer Matthew Eggers can be re ach ed at eggersm@umich.edu .
The post Messy on Main: The life and death of finsta appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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Importance
1
Kissing and Tiktoking: Gen Z girls reclaim the hookup story
by The Michigan Daily
Sep 26, 2021
“In the middle of a blue LED-lit dorm room housing a gaggle of first-year girls, a phone blares the elementary ABCs. “ Stand up if you’ve been with a J, ” a girl yells when the letter passes over the phone’s screen. Every girl shoots up and poses for the video, collectively groaning about their romantic experiences with the stereotypical, thoughtless “J-named boy.”
TikTok trends like the “ABC hookup list” embody how Gen-Z girls are reclaiming their sexual and romantic lives. Similarly, Gen-Z girls post humiliating dating, flirting and hookup stories set to Seal’s “Crazy” and “Are they hot or are they just (insert adjective here)” videos —  in which they illustrate the niche traits they find attractive in a love interest. By being honest on social media, recongizing both the triumphs and pitfalls of hook-ups and love, we erase the shame baked into the female experience. Thanks to TikTok, these conversations are broadcasted globally for girls to empathize with.
Older generations tell us what is “too mature” for our age and the media tells us what is “too prudish.” We are taught to laugh when Sandy wears both a long-sleeved cheer costume and a tight leather set in “Grease” and to sneer when Taylor Swift meets “yet another boyfriend.” Boys high-five their guy friends and stare at their girl friends when rumors about sexual encounters spread in the halls.
When society shames young women for their sexual or romantic histories, we internalize our struggles, desires and experiences as wrong or abnormal. If society were to destigmatize and recongize female sexual and romantic histories, we would be more equipped to accept and embrace our sexuality and ourselves. Until then, we are stuck in a vicious cycle, held to unattainable standards wherein sex and abstinence, being noncommittal and being romantic and fooling around and monogamy are all “wrong.” As we internalize these norms, nothing really feels “right.”
Teenage girls deserve an outlet to discuss their personal experiences with hookup culture. We find that outlet on Tiktok, where there is little shame in telling our story.
In dorms across the country, teen girls have been commiserating in each other’s romantic woes for decades. Digitization makes these conversations (set to music ranging from City Girls’ “Twerkulator” to the ABCs) more casual, open and funny — within the dorms and also on a global level. 
In TikTok trends like the “ABC hookup list,” girls blush as they stand for 26 letters or zero letters of the alphabet because others tell them it’s “too many” or “too few.” But within these small circles of laughing girls, removed from the pressures and expectations of what is “normal” for a teenage girl, there is no judgement. With secrets out in the open and set to a soundtrack of bouncy music, girls can have real, honest conversations. We can find solace in the fact that others go through the same things we do. We learn that sex and romance are personal, and we are all simply doing what is “right” for us. 
As my roommate stood for “M,” she told me about a high school crush who was far more than a crush. As I stood for “A,” I told her about my humiliating first kiss. We told each other we would look out for one another as we navigate college love with rose-colored glasses. These lovestruck conversations are just as important as the basic roommate inquiries: “When do you go to bed?” and “What’s your favorite movie?” Tiktok started these conversations.
When Gen-Z looks back with horror at our old TikToks, I hope we can be proud that we worked toward destigmatizing love, sex and adolescent absurdity via a 30-second clip set to the ABCs.
Daily Arts Contributor Kaya Ginsky can be reached at kginsky@umich.edu .
The post Kissing and Tiktoking: Gen Z girls reclaim the hookup story appeared first on The Michigan Daily .”

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